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Originally posted on Lily Wight:

     Updated 14/04/2014

     The third novel in the Malazan Cycle suffers the same highs and lows as its predecessor.  The first half is over-plotted and over-populated, more of an endurance test than an entertaining read.

     Once various subplots unite, for a spectacular midway siege, Erikson shifts up a league and delivers martial action and emotional character beats with familiar aplomb.

     Erikson’s enthusiasm for his secondary world is infectious, but his pacing and structure continue to irritate.

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Originally posted on Lily Wight:

     Updated 07/04/2014

     Too many new faces and places sap momentum in this now sprawling Fantasy series.

     Erikson’s prose has a captivating quality which will win patience from his readership but many sub-plots seem circular and unnecessary.  Characters are absent for several chapters so, by the time they return, you are likely to have forgotten who they are and what they are doing whilst the unceremonious dumping of a hugely important plot revelation is unforgivably clumsy.

     Erikson’s system of magic use seems over-complicated and only partially formed, suggesting a world and a plot which is dangerously close to escaping the clutches of its author.

     Erikson is at his best when describing martial combat and strategy.  His central plot thread, the imperiled exodus of refugees, is strong enough without extraneous sub-stories.  Erikson’s promise is unmistakable but he…

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Originally posted on Lily Wight:

      Updated 29/03/2014    

      Forget polite introductions and sedate world-building because Erikson’s opener is a merciless drag through war, politics, questing and magic which may swamp and baffle less dedicated Fantasy fans.

     Gardens of the Moon may be overpopulated and over-plotted but Erikson holds chaos at bay with genius page-turning prose and infectious enthusiasm.

     With a little more focus and honing the Malazan Books could achieve brilliance.

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More Lego Shakespeare

     If you enjoyed Lego William Shakespeare last month you’re sure to appreciate a brickish selection of his finest works…

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Lego Picks Every Month!  Click To See Them All  :)

     Quirky, surreal, handmade, steampunkish, road trip love story.  Trailer contains gratuitous use of the word “p*nis”.

More Movies You Might Have Missed :)

Originally posted on Lily Wight:

     Updated 15/03/2014

     Ostara (Old High German) or Ēostre (Old English) falls upon 20th March.  It is one of eight ancient Wheel Of The Year festivals denoting seasonal shifts.

     Ostara marks The Vernal (meaning “youthful”) Equinox: the height of Spring.

     Daylight and darkness are balanced at The Equinox, prior to the lengthening of days: a period sometimes referred to as Lent.  It is a time to celebrate fecundity and growth.

     Ostara is named for an ancient Germanic goddess and the month that bears her name; Ôstarmânoth, now April.

     Ostara is a dawn goddess associated to the Greek Eos and the Roman Aurora.  She represents the resurrection of light following the death of Winter.

     Ostara’s totem animal is the hare: a symbol of fertility dating…

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     Yep, you really do get a Gratuitous Gif every single month…

cutest-animal-gifs-hamster

More unmissable gifs from Lily Wight :)

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