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Archive for March 23rd, 2012

Updated 26/02/2015

This is truly the stuff of nightmares.  I’ll be sleeping with the bedside light on tonight!

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“Mound” by Allison Schulnik

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Updated 26/02/2015

There's No Room Back Here.

I know I’m late to the game here but this is amazing. I only discovered Street of Crocodiles after reading Bruno Schulz for the first time, embarrassingly only a few days ago. Gotta start somewhere.

EAT YOUR HEART OUT, DAVID LYNCH.

On a side note, Bruno Schulz is my new obsession. I will facebooklike him in my heart for ever and ever and ever. I’m aware that I’m a huge geek because I’m fangirling over a dead Polish author with a very small body of work, a man who was most likely a bit creepy.

Example A:

This is an old picture and the quality is compromised clearly, but LOOK AT HIS FACE. Stop staring at me like that, stop it. No.

In any case, the short novel The Street of Crocodiles / The Cinnamon Shops are online. Go read a book! (On a computer screen.) Even the cover…

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Seven of Swords

Some amazing images here.

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Updated 26/02/2015

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     Updated 06/02/2014

     Kate Mosse’s début novel, Labyrinth was much-loved and promoted by Richard and Judy’s TV book club allowing Mosse to swiftly and decisively establish herself as the female answer to blockbusting airport favourite Dan Brown.

     Sepulchre, Mosse’s second standalone novel, combines folklore and history to weave a simple yet compelling treasure-hunt mystery with Tarot magic and the lush French countryside thrown in for good measure.

     As with Labyrinth the past and present intertwine around the comparable adventures of two female protagonists but the Nineteenth Century heroine easily trumps her modern-day counterpart whilst secondary characters are frustratingly underwritten for a novel with such a hefty word count.

     It is Mosse’s descriptive and lyrical prose which prevents accusations of peddling pulp and Sepulchre stays the right side of sentiment; emerging as the thinking woman’s Romantic Fiction.

     A light, unchallenging but highly enjoyable read.

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Tarot

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