Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2012

     Updated 30/9/2015

     If you would like to see more images from the Victoriana album just click below to link or go to the Gallery tab at the top of the homepage (www.lilywight.com).

     You can friend/follow Lily Wight on Facebook or follow @Lily_Wight on Twitter xxx

     Try another post 🙂

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Click the link above to view an inspired Star Wars themed video that you used to know…

David J Rodger ¦ Science Fiction & Dark Fantasy

Stars Wars – Gotye parody

Once in a while somebody comes along with a custom-crafted video that just hits the mark. This one by  teddiefilms brings together the superb combination of sound and visuals of Gotye (Somebody That I Used To Know) – and some quirky one-liners to give George Lucus and his prequels a highly qualified pasting.   I love the stand-in for the ft.Kimbra role. It ain’t a woman. The actor really plays (him) well.  :o)

.

.

You treat me like a Bantha and I feel so low

.

What Happened to the Star Wars that I used to know?

.

And what’s the deal with having me be dubbed over (Noooooooooo!)

.

CREDITS

DARTH GOTYE: Tyson Apostol
GEORGE L: Mike Loveland (http://www.ollibird.com)

MUSIC ARRANGED BY: Israel Curtis, http://Somakat.com
ADDITIONAL INSTRUMENTS: Josh Aker, http://Somakat.com
DARTH VOCALS BY: Israel Curtis
GEORGE VOCALS BY: Ryan Richardson

LYRICS BY:

View original post 74 more words

Read Full Post »

     Please don’t be concerned Blogsprites!  The title quote comes from the BBC’s superlative little series The Bleak Old Shop Of Stuff.

     The show was first broadcast on the radio and was bumped-up to television status with a Christmas Special in 2011.

     Heavily influenced by the searing wit and irreverent comedy of Blackadder The Bleak Old Shop is a must-see for Dickens’ fans or anyone with a taste for Victoriana and a sense of humour.

     Watch wherever you can!

Read Full Post »

  

*Postage stamps, matches, refrigerators, lightbulbs, antiseptic, inflatable tyres, cars, buses, telephones, iron bridges, railways, cameras, bandstands and promenades are all Victorian inventions.

*After the death of Prince Albert (1861) Queen Victoria dressed in black and had fresh clothes and a wash-stand prepared for Albert every day.

*She also spoke of “the mad, wicked folly of women’s rights”.  No comment.

*Only two British monarchs have reached their Diamond Jubilee.  Victoria celebrated hers in 1897.

*Britain and China went to war… over Opium trafficking!

*A large part of the world still speaks English today because of Victoria’s empire.

*The Commonwealth is made up of countries which were once under British rule.

*The River Thames was so thick with sewage that paddle-steamers could hardly move.  After 30 years of work a new improved sewage system was completed in 1875.  It is still in use today.

*Victorian architecture favoured Medieval Gothic and Classical Roman or Greek styles.

*The first Victorian computer was called the “analytic engine”.

 

     All facts borrowed from The Victorians by Robert Hull.

     Click here for another post 🙂

Read Full Post »

     Updated 17/06/2014

     Here at The Arcade of Arts & Arcana we are not ashamed to trawl kids’ books for fascinating factoids.  Here are few of our findings…

 

*Great Ormond Street Children’s Hospital opened in 1852.  If you scroll down the sidebar you will find a link to Children With Cancer UK, this site’s nominated charity 🙂 

*Edward Jenner helped to wipe out smallpox in just 40 years when free vaccinations became available in 1840.

*The bell residing in the Houses of Parliament clock tower was cast in 1858 and named for building supervisor Sir Benjamin Hall.  Big Ben of course.

*Building ships from steel instead of heavy iron was a very good idea.

*Charles Kingsley’s The Water Babies (1863) influenced Parliament to pass the Chimney Sweeps Act.  The use of children as sweeps was finally stamped out in 1875.

*Today southeast Asia produces 90% of the world’s rubber.  Rubber seeds were originally sourced in South America, shipped to the UK for cultivation at Kew Gardens and re-distributed to Malaysia and Indonesia.

*The first bicycle, the Penny Farthing, was made in 1883 with solid tyres and no brakes.

*The first electric underground railway opened in London in 1890.  The system soon became known as “The Tube”.

*Many UK newspapers were founded in the Victorian era.  The Times rose to prominence by reporting on the blunders of The Crimean War.

*Many Scots families emigrated to Canada (settling Nova Scotia or New Scotland) due to their own, less well-known potato famine.

 

     All these facts are borrowed from The Victorian Age 1837-1914 by James Harrison.

     Click for another post 🙂

Read Full Post »

Updated 11/05/2013 –

The best Han Solo pic you’ve ever seen?

Read Full Post »

     

     Updated 14/06/2014

     It takes a writer as bold as Game of Throne’s George R.R. Martin to pen a Southern Gothic vampire novel just three years after the publication of Anne Rice’s genre-bending Interview With The Vampire.

     Martin’s Fevre Dream includes plenty of Rice’s familiar tropes – such as setting, era and two bickering immortal dandies – but Fevre Dream has less romance and more grit, as though two writers used the same remit to inspire very different tales.

     Martin pens marvellous prose in any genre, he is descriptive but never dull and poetic without being florid.  He has a knack for authentic, character-crafting speech and an ability to make even the driest detail fascinating so readers will come away with a new love and comprehensive understanding of life as a Mississippi steamboat captain even if such a subject previously held no appeal.  The subtle inclusion of issues of race and prejudice also provide authenticity and much food for thought.
     Most admirable is Martin’s creation of a truly memorable and scene-stealing mortal character in a genre over-populated with charismatic bloodsuckers.  Captain Abner Brown is unfailingly human – quite literally warts and all! – and his singular tale provides an entirely satisfying, sequel free conclusion.
     Vampire fans may see a link between Fevre Dream and True Blood as Martin may be the first author to suggest a synthetic blood “cure”, an idea that is constantly evolving in the genre.  So, regardless of whether you prefer your vampire novels from The Old World or The New, Fevre Dream deserves the status of a  modern classic alongside the likes of Rice’s Vampire Chronicles and Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend.

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: