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Posts Tagged ‘Anne Rice’

Lily Wight

     Updated 08/07/2015

     Lily Wight is always available to be the sanguinous stuffing in an Anne Rice and Clive Barker sandwich – so please tuck in 😉

     The Grande Dame of Grand Guignol and The Master of The Macabre (via official administrator, Alex) were kind enough to recommend and share features from the blog at www.lilywight.com with their huge online communities.

     Just click the links below for these unmissable posts ~

“The Wolf Gift” scored this generous review by Lily Wight and I’m grateful.  Also note the cool use of Ran Valerhon’s art in this review.  Love it.

Anne Rice, 19th February 2013.

https://lilywight.com/2013/02/13/a-present-from-anne-rice-the-wolf-gift-matt-bomer-christian-grey/

Here’s a new blog post on Nightbreed by Lily Wight.

~ Clive Barker (administrated by Alex Ghastbrow) 21st February 2013.

https://lilywight.com/2013/02/21/clive-barker-cabal-nightbreed-directors-cut/

     Thank you, fellow imagineers x

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Lily Wight

     Updated 22/04/2015

     It is nearly forty years since Anne Rice refined and defined our contemporary Romantic Vampire archetype with her seminal and controversial novel Interview With The Vampire.

     Rice may have returned to The Universal Studio Monster Vault (vampires, mummies and now wolfmen) but her latest foray into the supernatural is distinctly light on familiar Gothic tropes and offers something entirely current via the imagination of an author steeped in history and mythology.

     The Wolf Gift is a superhero origin story with the werewolf or “Morphenkind”, Reuben Golding, glorified and elevated into a shape-shifting biological missing-link: a creature designed to track and destroy the very essence of evil.

     The bright, breezy world of modern San Francisco offers architectural and natural majesty a world away from the grim, historical Grand Guignol of Rice’s Vampire…

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Lily Wight

     

     Updated 14/06/2014

     It takes a writer as bold as Game of Throne’s George R.R. Martin to pen a Southern Gothic vampire novel just three years after the publication of Anne Rice’s genre-bending Interview With The Vampire.

     Martin’s Fevre Dream includes plenty of Rice’s familiar tropes – such as setting, era and two bickering immortal dandies – but Fevre Dream has less romance and more grit, as though two writers used the same remit to inspire very different tales.

     Martin pens marvellous prose in any genre, he is descriptive but never dull and poetic without being florid.  He has a knack for authentic, character-crafting speech and an ability to make even the driest detail fascinating so readers will come away with a new love and comprehensive understanding of life as a Mississippi steamboat captain even if…

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     Updated 08/07/2015

     Lily Wight is always available to be the sanguinous stuffing in an Anne Rice and Clive Barker sandwich – so please tuck in 😉

     The Grande Dame of Grand Guignol and The Master of The Macabre (via official administrator, Alex) were kind enough to recommend and share features from the blog at www.lilywight.com with their huge online communities.

     Just click the links below for these unmissable posts ~

“The Wolf Gift” scored this generous review by Lily Wight and I’m grateful.  Also note the cool use of Ran Valerhon’s art in this review.  Love it.

Anne Rice, 19th February 2013.

https://lilywight.com/2013/02/13/a-present-from-anne-rice-the-wolf-gift-matt-bomer-christian-grey/

Here’s a new blog post on Nightbreed by Lily Wight.

~ Clive Barker (administrated by Alex Ghastbrow) 21st February 2013.

https://lilywight.com/2013/02/21/clive-barker-cabal-nightbreed-directors-cut/

     Thank you, fellow imagineers x

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     Lily Wight ~ The Arcade Of Arts & Arcana is one year old today!!!

     That’s 315 posts, over 37,000 visitors, 4,240 followers across 8 social networks, recommendations and shares from Anne Rice and Clive Barker and a personal record of  1,835 visits in one glorious day.

     I never envisaged such an encouraging response when I launched my first hesitant blog post.

     Please re-acquaint yourself right here: https://lilywight.com/2012/12/18/blog-post-of-the-year-2012-number-3/

     What is a birthday without presents?  I would like to thank and recommend the authors who gifted me these much appreciated blog awards;

Thank you http://enchantedsolitaire.com/ for the second star on my Blog Of The Year 2012 Award.

Very Inspiring Blogger Award gratefully received from http://bellnight.wordpress.com/

     Now, time to party… 😉

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     Updated 22/04/2015

     It is nearly forty years since Anne Rice refined and defined our contemporary Romantic Vampire archetype with her seminal and controversial novel Interview With The Vampire.

     Rice may have returned to The Universal Studio Monster Vault (vampires, mummies and now wolfmen) but her latest foray into the supernatural is distinctly light on familiar Gothic tropes and offers something entirely current via the imagination of an author steeped in history and mythology.

     The Wolf Gift is a superhero origin story with the werewolf or “Morphenkind”, Reuben Golding, glorified and elevated into a shape-shifting biological missing-link: a creature designed to track and destroy the very essence of evil.

     The bright, breezy world of modern San Francisco offers architectural and natural majesty a world away from the grim, historical Grand Guignol of Rice’s Vampire Chronicles.  There is surprisingly little Fantasy here as Rice comes closer than ever to explaining her story’s wonders with real science.  Religion and Catholicism, once Rice’s most prevalent concerns, are here reduced to the passive, infrequent presence of an agnostic family priest.

     Rice loves to pepper her work with pop-culture references resulting in an astute self-referentialism which makes The Wolf Gift the most playful of all her novels.  Reuben himself is aware of the looks and career which define him as a “Superman”.

     Those who have found Rice’s previous novels unwieldy will discover a brisker pace and a manageable cast of characters, each of whom – in typical Rice style –  is more admirable, brilliant and beautiful than the next.  Rice is an unashamed aesthete who favours all that is sublime in nature, art, craft and engineering.  Her prose is lush, richly detailed and decorous although her critics may find this cloying.

     Rice loves to flaunt her extensive research and a suggested species mythology promises a new series that will unfold, much like The Vampire Chronicles to take in history, travel and esoteric enlightenment.

     The Wolf Gift is the book that fans of vintage Anne Rice have been waiting for.

Reuben in the Window.  ©Valeron.  Image features Matt Bomer, Anne Rice’s preferred casting choice for Reuben Golding.

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     Count Dracula (alongside fellow Victorian gentleman, Sherlock Holmes) holds the dubious honour of being the Movie World’s hardest working (and most abused) literary character.

     Francis Ford Coppola’s 1992 adaptation is a gloriously bombastic mountain of soft-focus eroto-nonsense but a highly recommended guilty pleasure.

     Coppola claimed that his version would be the closest ever interpretation of Stoker’s classic novel but his attempts to include every character whilst frequently switching narrative perspective makes for a cluttered and unfocused movie.  Dracula is depicted in his numerous evolving guises but the inclusion of a psuedo-historical prologue forces a new reincarnation theme on the tale.

     Dracula was released just prior to Neil Jordan’s adaptation of  Interview With The Vampire and has too much in common with Anne Rice’s genre-changing interpretation of vampire archetypes as immortal dreamboats.  Coppola’s film oozes lush Freudian imagery; sinking suns, blood cells, eyes, nipples and fragrant blooms are everywhere.

     Oldman himself admitted to essaying Dracula as “a Fallen Angel” and the beloved actor deserves much credit for creating a tour-de-force (and cohesive) performance with a role that required him to play a medieval relic, a romantic Victorian Prince, a wolfman, a bat and just about every stage in between.

     His Eastern European accent is sublime or ridiculous but unforgettable either way.  Many have forgotten that he was nominated for an Oscar for this role.  As a Fantasy character he was never likely to win (even The Lord Of The Rings failed to gain plaudits for its cast) but his creation is every bit as unique as Depp’s Jack Sparrow.

     Rumour has it that Winona Ryder petitioned hard to have her then boyfriend Johnny Depp cast as Jonathan Harker.  Depp fans would no doubt love to have seen this but it is hard to imagine how he could have improved or altered the end result.  Some films are actually enhanced by unintentional comedy moments.  Keanu Reeves is one long comedy moment.   It is enough that Reeves is simply awful and memorable (with a grey streak that turns into a continuity nightmare and helpfully distracts from his lack of performance).

     Perhaps it is time to watch Coppola’s Dracula again.  The set and costume designs are lavish, Lucy’s beheading has genuine chills, Antony Hopkins goes all out to match Oldman’s Method mania and the orchestral score is magnificent.

     It’s guilty, yes…but pleasurable.

 

 

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