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Posts Tagged ‘Celtic’

     It’s time to harvest the grain and cereal crops and show a little love for the sun-god, Lugh.  Click the link to read The Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year and discover the origins of this annual August festival.

https://lilywight.com/2013/08/01/lughnasadh-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

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Lily Wight

     Updated 29/04/2014

     Beltane (meaning “bright fire”) or May Day is one of eight festival days marked upon the ancient seasonal calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.

     Beltane heralds the beginning of Summer as it lies halfway between The Spring Equinox (Ostara) and The Summer Solstice (Litha).  It is a time when daylight hours are long, trees blossom and herding animals are turned out to pasture.

     Beltane was originally observed by the Gaelic people of Ireland, Scotland and The Isle Of Man who performed protective rituals for their crops and livestock whilst The Celtic Tribes of Western Europe and Britain also celebrated mating rituals and male potency.

     Beltane is named for the Celtic Sun God, Bel (Belenos/Belenus) who is associated with West Cornwall, formerly Belerion.  The Romans dubbed him the “British Apollo” and…

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A wonderful post about the Celtic origins of Halloween with a bedtime story thrown in.  Sweet dreams, Blogsprites.

Chrissy Derbyshire

The wheel of the year turns to October. We notice the chill in the air, the earlier dark, rain and rust-red leaves. In the supermarket, oversized boxes of gummy ghosts and snakes take their place next to spiderweb garlands, vampire teeth and pointy hats. Pumpkins are selling out quick, soon to be grinning gargoyles on the doorstep and hearty soups on the stove. Hallowe’en is a much-maligned holiday in our modern times. It is a widely-held misconception that the holiday originated in America as an excuse to sell cards and costumes – that it is both a recent development in our folklore, and a cynical one. Neither of these is true. Hallowe’en originates from Celtic Britain. It stems from a culture that believed in magic and took it seriously, a culture for whom Faeryland and the Land of the Dead were interchangeable, and for whom, on certain auspicious days, the…

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