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Posts Tagged ‘Eclipse’

Lily Wight

     Updated 28/01/2014

     It’s almost a decade since Stephenie Meyer’s first Twilight novel was published and here is the last review of our four book retrospective…

     Breaking Dawn is undoubtedly the most mature and entertaining book in the series with more incident, action and horror than all the previous volumes put together.

     Discerning fans might try to excuse, scan or simply ignore Edward and Bella’s nauseating honeymoon and enjoy instead Jacob’s first person narration of the birth of their monster offspring.

     The Twililght Series has always tended to be a little tame and anaemic but by introducing that classic horror staple – the “demon-child” – Meyer invigorates the tale creating, arguably, a better starting-point for the entire series.

     Unfortunately Meyer bungles the ending by rushing the introductions to an influx of interesting new characters and…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 25/01/2014

     We’re three books – and three reviews in – yet The Twilight Saga refuses staunchly to improve or evolve as its little flashes of brilliance are swamped with so much melodramatic waffle.

     Stephenie Meyer obviously missed the writer’s workshop on “show, don’t tell” because those pages of circular dialogue do not equal plot momentum.

     An inspired chapter on Quileute folklore provides too brief a respite and elevation by delivering a tantalising glimpse into a better book that never was.  More of this and less of Bella might have given the saga more depth to match its breadth.

     Meyer has an unfortunate habit of disappointing readers with ideas and plot-strands which fail to flourish.  She denies Bella the opportunity to embrace the fate of The Third Wife thus denying Eclipse…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 18/01/2014

     It is nearly a decade since the launch of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga so New Moon, the second book in the series, may already seem like old news to the next generation of teens.  Let’s take another peek under the cover…

     The Twilight Saga becomes increasingly derivative as it seeks for ideas to expand upon its potentially intriguing but ultimately restrictive central romance.

     Things get off to a promising start with Meyer adding a third-party to her ongoing variations upon the classic and reliable “Beauty and The Beast meets Romeo and Juliet” yarn.  Replacing static lust-object Edward with the earthier and charismatic Jacob makes for a more mature and complex romance, whilst the Native American Shapeshifter lore feels original and fresh.

     There is also some vastly improved prose. The stormy build-up to Bella’s…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 11/01/2014

     It is almost a decade since Stephenie Meyer’s genre-busting archetype-twisting début novel Twilight was published.  Now that this much-loved yet contentious saga is definitely over and RPatz and KStew have gone their separate ways (or have they?) perhaps it is time for a reassessment.

     Fans of hardcore horror and esoteric gothicism will feel vaguely violated by this dilution of Vampire Mythology for the Young Adult market but Twilight heroine, Bella Swan is as clingy as a Spider Monkey 😉

     Unfortunately Twilight’s magnificent PR campaign will forever be superior to its subject and style – melodramatic teen diary destined to alienate literary-minded adults.  It also commits the unfortunate crime of being a mere introduction to better things to come.

     Heroine Bella details her chores one minute and snipes about her perfectly nice and…

View original post 128 more words

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     Updated 28/01/2014

     It’s almost a decade since Stephenie Meyer’s first Twilight novel was published and here is the last review of our four book retrospective…

     Breaking Dawn is undoubtedly the most mature and entertaining book in the series with more incident, action and horror than all the previous volumes put together.

     Discerning fans might try to excuse, scan or simply ignore Edward and Bella’s nauseating honeymoon and enjoy instead Jacob’s first person narration of the birth of their monster offspring.

     The Twililght Series has always tended to be a little tame and anaemic but by introducing that classic horror staple – the “demon-child” – Meyer invigorates the tale creating, arguably, a better starting-point for the entire series.

     Unfortunately Meyer bungles the ending by rushing the introductions to an influx of interesting new characters and building-up to another battle that is ultimately subverted, an error which the movie adaptation sought fittingly to put right.  The law-court style finale is full of holes whilst Bella’s new super-powers and Alice’s timely arrival are lazy and convenient contrivances.

     Of course this series has entertained but the premise has been superior to the execution and Meyer’s moralising frequently blunders towards patronising.  Is it ever a good idea to promote marriage straight out of school because you are desperate to have sex?   

     the hysteria has waned and new franchises jostle for the limelight The Twilight Saga’s grown-up fans may look back and wonder what all the fuss was about.

Do You Agree?  Read The Rest Below

Twilight

New Moon 

Eclipse

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     Updated 25/01/2014

     We’re three books – and three reviews in – yet The Twilight Saga refuses staunchly to improve or evolve as its little flashes of brilliance are swamped with so much melodramatic waffle.

     Stephenie Meyer obviously missed the writer’s workshop on “show, don’t tell” because those pages of circular dialogue do not equal plot momentum.

     An inspired chapter on Quileute folklore provides too brief a respite and elevation by delivering a tantalising glimpse into a better book that never was.  More of this and less of Bella might have given the saga more depth to match its breadth.

     Meyer has an unfortunate habit of disappointing readers with ideas and plot-strands which fail to flourish.  She denies Bella the opportunity to embrace the fate of The Third Wife thus denying Eclipse its chance of  genuine mythic relevance.

     Too many of Eclipse’s significant events and action scenes fail to receive the benefit of build-up.  A large concluding battle narrated secondhand is unforgivable.

     Meyer’s work still fails to feel tangible because the world beyond her main players is sketchy and inconsistent.  Jasper’s personality transplant from Cullen black-sheep to seasoned military veteran is simply a plot convenience.

     Twilight continues to feel like a saga stretched too far.

Don’t Miss The Rest…

Twilight

New Moon

Breaking Dawn

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     Updated 18/01/2014

     It is nearly a decade since the launch of Stephenie Meyer’s Twilight Saga so New Moon, the second book in the series, may already seem like old news to the next generation of teens.  Let’s take another peek under the cover…

     The Twilight Saga becomes increasingly derivative as it seeks for ideas to expand upon its potentially intriguing but ultimately restrictive central romance.

     Things get off to a promising start with Meyer adding a third-party to her ongoing variations upon the classic and reliable “Beauty and The Beast meets Romeo and Juliet” yarn.  Replacing static lust-object Edward with the earthier and charismatic Jacob makes for a more mature and complex romance, whilst the Native American Shapeshifter lore feels original and fresh.

     There is also some vastly improved prose. The stormy build-up to Bella’s cliff jump for example crosses the line between pulp to literature with description which feels poetic instead of merely perfunctory.

     Unfortunately, after improvements, Meyer bungles the ending with an Italian episode that feels transferred wholesale from Anne Rice’s Vampire Chronicles to a degree that borders on wholesale theft.  The Volturi are audaciously similar to Armand’s Grand Guignol performers or Santino’s Rome-based coven and Edward’s decision to provoke the elders by revealing his true nature at a public event is pure Lestat.  Anne Rice fans will also recall Armand’s attempt to immolate himself.

     Despite the Euro-based mis-step and a shallow attempt to introduce older vampire lore Meyer shows increased promise when handling the nuances of small-town teen-romance and she should be commended for a sensitive and realistic depiction of heroine Bella’s debilitating period of depression.

Related Articles

Twilight

Eclipse

Breaking Dawn

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