Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Events’

     The Autumn Equinox marks the annual fruit and vegetable harvest and is the season best known for apple-picking.

     According to Arthurian Tradition the fallen King Arthur was transported to Avalon – “The Isle of Apples” – symbolising winter death and the promise of rebirth in spring.

     Click the link below to discover more about this Wheel of The Year festival…

https://lilywight.com/2013/09/25/modron-the-autumn-equinox-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

Read Full Post »

     It’s time to harvest the grain and cereal crops and show a little love for the sun-god, Lugh.  Click the link to read The Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year and discover the origins of this annual August festival.

https://lilywight.com/2013/08/01/lughnasadh-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

Read Full Post »

     You can call it Midsummer, The Longest Day, Litha or The Summer Solstice.  Whichever you prefer just click the link to read all about it in our popular guide to The Wheel of The Year festivals…

https://lilywight.com/2013/06/20/litha-the-summer-solstice-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

Read Full Post »

     How will you celebrate your May Day bank holiday weekend?  You could always get married, jump over a broomstick or get naked and paint yourself red like these folks.

     You can discover the origins and traditions of the Beltane festival by clicking the link below for Lily Wight’s Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year.

Beltane Fire Festival

https://lilywight.com/2013/05/01/beltane-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

Read Full Post »

     Ostara is an Anglo-Germanic fertility festival celebrated at The Spring Equinox.  This year’s festival coincides with a rare solar eclipse on Friday 20th March.  Click the link to read all about it in Lily Wight’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year.

 

https://lilywight.com/2013/03/20/ostara-spring-equinox-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

Read Full Post »

     The Celtic Fire Festival, Imbolc is celebrated on the 1st of February.  Click the link to read all about it in Lily Wight’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year.

 

 https://lilywight.com/2013/02/02/imbolc-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

Updated 18/12/2014

     There are four Solar Quarter Days (two equinoxes and two solstices) on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  Yule or The Winter Solstice is celebrated during a twelve day period from December into January.

     Yule commemorates the demise and rebirth of the sun’s powers because The Wheel continues to turn and daylight hours begin to lengthen again beyond The Shortest Day.

     The name “Yule” is thought to derive from the Old Norse ” jólnar”  – a collective term for the gods or “Yule Ones”.   Jólfaðr (Yule Father – interchangeable with All-Father) is one of many names attributed to Odin.  In Old Norse poetry names and terms for Odin are frequently synonymous with celebration and feasting.  Odin The Gift-Giver is undoubtedly the origin of our Santa Claus.

     The Midwinter period between the last harvest (Samhain)…

View original post 390 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Samhain – pronounced “sow – inn” and known presently as Halloween – is celebrated from sunset to sunset on 31st October to 1st November.  It is the most important Fire Festival or Sabbat on the ancient Wheel of The Year calendar.

     “Samhain” has been variously translated as “first frost” or “Summer’s end”:  opposing suggestions with the same meaning.  It is the name for November in ancient and modern Gaelic.

     Samhain lies between The Autumn Equinox and The Winter Solstice.  It marks the death of the year and the end of the annual agricultural cycle.  Many ancient cultures throughout The Western Hemisphere regarded Samhain as their New Year’s Eve.

     Samhain is the third and final harvest on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  After Lughnasadh (grain and cereals) and Modron (fruit and vegetables) herding communities drove livestock back from…

View original post 423 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Updated 23/09/2014

     The Wheel Of The Year calendar comprises four Celtic fire festivals interspersed with two solstice and two equinox celebrations.  September’s Equinox denotes the height of the Autumn season.

     The Autumn Equinox is named variably as Modron (Mother Goddess) or Mabon (Divine Son) – deities from Welsh Mythology who can be found in The Legends Of King Arthur.

     Modron is a harvest and fertility goddess who shares characteristics with the Roman Ceres.  On the agricultural calendar Lughnasadh (August) is The First Harvest (grains and cereals) and The Autumn Equinox (September) is The Second Harvest (fruits and vegetables).

     At the Equinox the year wanes, yet the harvest is plentiful.   The ancient tribal people of The Western Hemisphere believed their Mother Goddess entered the third trimester of her pregnancy whilst her…

View original post 142 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Updated 29/07/2014

     Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-na-sah) is one of eight festivals celebrated on the ancient Wheel Of The Year seasonal calendar.  It marks the midpoint between The Summer Solstice and The Autumn Equinox.  It was once observed when the first sheaf of corn was cut and now, most commonly, on 1st August.

     The First Harvest is named for the Irish Sun God, Lugh, who also lends his name to the Modern Irish name for August.  In Gaelic Mythology Lugh held a funeral and athletic games to honour his foster-mother, Tailtiu who died of exhaustion after clearing the land for agriculture.  Tailtiu represents an earth or harvest deity whose labours feed and nurture the people.

     At Lughnasadh tribal people throughout Western Europe and The Northern Hemisphere gave thanks for their grain and cereal harvest and sought blessings for…

View original post 243 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Updated 24/06/2014

     The ancient seasonal calendar – known as The Wheel Of The Year – has reached Litha (meaning “wheel”) also known as The Longest Day, Midsummer and The Summer Solstice.

     Litha marks the height of the sun’s powers at the middle of the year before the inevitable shortening of daylight hours.

     Midsummer has been observed since Neolithic times.  It held special significance to the Scandinavian, Germanic and Anglo-Saxon people and is still celebrated throughout The Northern Hemisphere today.

     Litha was a time to urge the growth of crops in the hope of a plentiful harvest.  A wheel would be set on fire and rolled downhill to “warm” the fields, a practice first recorded two thousand years ago.

     Golden-flowered  Midsummer plants, such as Calendula and St. John’s…

View original post 201 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Updated 29/04/2014

     Beltane (meaning “bright fire”) or May Day is one of eight festival days marked upon the ancient seasonal calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.

     Beltane heralds the beginning of Summer as it lies halfway between The Spring Equinox (Ostara) and The Summer Solstice (Litha).  It is a time when daylight hours are long, trees blossom and herding animals are turned out to pasture.

     Beltane was originally observed by the Gaelic people of Ireland, Scotland and The Isle Of Man who performed protective rituals for their crops and livestock whilst The Celtic Tribes of Western Europe and Britain also celebrated mating rituals and male potency.

     Beltane is named for the Celtic Sun God, Bel (Belenos/Belenus) who is associated with West Cornwall, formerly Belerion.  The Romans dubbed him the “British Apollo” and…

View original post 260 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Updated 15/03/2014

     Ostara (Old High German) or Ēostre (Old English) falls upon 20th March.  It is one of eight ancient Wheel Of The Year festivals denoting seasonal shifts.

     Ostara marks The Vernal (meaning “youthful”) Equinox: the height of Spring.

     Daylight and darkness are balanced at The Equinox, prior to the lengthening of days: a period sometimes referred to as Lent.  It is a time to celebrate fecundity and growth.

     Ostara is named for an ancient Germanic goddess and the month that bears her name; Ôstarmânoth, now April.

     Ostara is a dawn goddess associated to the Greek Eos and the Roman Aurora.  She represents the resurrection of light following the death of Winter.

     Ostara’s totem animal is the hare: a symbol of fertility dating…

View original post 133 more words

Read Full Post »

Lily Wight

     Updated for 2015

     Imbolc (pronounced i-MOLK meaning “in the belly”) is one of eight seasonal festivals marked on the ancient calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.  Imbolc is observed on 1st February each year.

     Imbolc heralds the first stirrings of  Spring as it lies halfway between The Winter Solstice (Yule) and The Spring Equinox (Ostara).  It is a time when days lengthen, new buds and shoots appear and the first lambs are born.

     Imbolc was originally observed by the Gaelic (Irish, Scottish and Manx) people as a vital indicator of a new agricultural year.

     The festival was deemed sacred to the Gaelic goddess Brighid (pronounced breed) the midwife of the year and protector of women, children and newborns. 

     Hearthfire celebrations involved the baking of bannocks; the origin…

View original post 101 more words

Read Full Post »

Updated 18/12/2014

     There are four Solar Quarter Days (two equinoxes and two solstices) on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  Yule or The Winter Solstice is celebrated during a twelve day period from December into January.

     Yule commemorates the demise and rebirth of the sun’s powers because The Wheel continues to turn and daylight hours begin to lengthen again beyond The Shortest Day.

     The name “Yule” is thought to derive from the Old Norse ” jólnar”  – a collective term for the gods or “Yule Ones”.   Jólfaðr (Yule Father – interchangeable with All-Father) is one of many names attributed to Odin.  In Old Norse poetry names and terms for Odin are frequently synonymous with celebration and feasting.  Odin The Gift-Giver is undoubtedly the origin of our Santa Claus.

     The Midwinter period between the last harvest (Samhain) and the stirrings of Spring (Imbolc) was a time of hardship for agricultural communities.  A feast of preserved foods and good fellowship whilst celebrating warmth and light would boost morale and inspire hope during a bleak and inhospitable time.

     Homes and halls would be decorated with evergreens to symbolise life’s tenacity in a barren landscape and anticipate the rebirth of Spring.  Spikey holly – with its blood-red berries – represented protection, ivy denoted endurance and mistletoe (for kissing under) symbolised fertility.

     Germanic and Celtic people perceived the mating cycle of their Father and Mother deities in the changing seasons.  At Midwinter the solar god – who passed into The Underworld at Samhain (Halloween) is reincarnated as his own sacred son and “reborn” to the goddess at Yule.

     Yule is also regarded as the season of The Wild Hunt, a supernatural procession of hounds, horses and huntsmen.  Hunt leaders vary, from horned gods to folk heroes, depending on country and culture.  In the United Kingdom hunt leaders include Odin’s equivalent Woden, Gaelic Fairy Folk, Herne The Hunter and King Arthur.

     Hunt leaders, often cursed into service, would manifest in their most violent and dangerous forms to cleanse the realm, both spiritually and physically, by rounding-up stray spirits, changelings, evil folk and wrongdoers.  Early Christian clerics regarded hunt legends as diabolical due to their association with horned gods and hoofed animals.  Controversial Boxing Day Hunts are still enacted throughout the UK today.

     Father Christmas’s supernatural chariot drawn by horned and hoofed reindeer bears association to The Wild Hunt.  Santa is most likely derived from Odin – a giver of gifts to those who are nice – but also, as a Hunt leader, a judge to those who are deemed “naughty”.  In Belgium and The Netherlands Santa Claus is assisted not by Norse Elves but Zwarte Piets; the devilish child-taunting mischief-makers who paint their faces to resemble, you guessed it, the followers of The Hunt.

     However you choose to celebrate remember that Yule is a time to recuperate and re-energise ourselves in preparation for another turn of The Wheel and the coming of a brand new Spring.

 

Read Full Post »

     Updated 23/10/2014

     Samhain – pronounced “sow – inn” and known presently as Halloween – is celebrated from sunset to sunset on 31st October to 1st November.  It is the most important Fire Festival or Sabbat on the ancient Wheel of The Year calendar.

     “Samhain” has been variously translated as “first frost” or “Summer’s end”:  opposing suggestions with the same meaning.  It is the name for November in ancient and modern Gaelic.

     Samhain lies between The Autumn Equinox and The Winter Solstice.  It marks the death of the year and the end of the annual agricultural cycle.  Many ancient cultures throughout The Western Hemisphere regarded Samhain as their New Year’s Eve.

     Samhain is the third and final harvest on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  After Lughnasadh (grain and cereals) and Modron (fruit and vegetables) herding communities drove livestock back from Summer pasture to be housed or slaughtered for winter, furthering the festival’s associations with death.  The eighth century scholar, Bede refers to November as the “blood month”.

     According to ancient beliefs the mythic courtship of a god and goddess symbolised the eternal rotation of seasons.  At Samhain the Goddess, in her crone or hag aspect, midwifes the waning or sacrificed God into the Underworld where he will journey until his rebirth at Yule with the promise of Spring. 

     Crone Goddesses, such as Celtic Ceridwen and Greek Hecate, ease transitions and guard borders and crossroads.  They are keepers of arcane wisdom and herbal lore who are associated with broomsticks (for cleansing thresholds) and cauldrons (for brewing natural medicines).  Halloween “witches” are a modern remnant of this frequently misunderstood ancient archetype.

     Sexy Halloween witches owe their style to The Morrígan, the Gaelic Dark Mother or Raven Goddess  who presides over death and battle – akin to the Scandinavian Valkyries.  At Samhain The Morrígan mates with The Dagda (the Gaelic All-Father) to bring creation from chaos.

     Samhain is considered a liminal time; when the veil between the mortal and the preternatural realms – the living and the dead – is at its thinnest.  Ancestors are remembered and honoured with a variety of worldwide customs that continue to this day, such as the Mexican Dia de Los Meurtos or Day of The Dead.

     Costuming for Halloween is an ancient tradition with many possible origins and purposes.  Celebrants may have daubed themselves with ash from ritual bonfires or disguised themselves to confuse, deter or even consort with mischievous otherworldly creatures before parading from house to house to collect donations for the Samhain feast: the likely origin of trick or treating.

     It wouldn’t be Samhain without a pumpkin lantern.  The gourd was the first domesticated plant species and has been used for carving for thousands of years.  Pumpkin lamps were carved with fearsome faces as festival decorations; to light parades and repel unwelcome spirits.  Jack o’ Lantern was another name for will-o’-the-wisp; strange but naturally occurring flares of marsh gas.  Jack o’ Lantern evolved into a folkloric hero who tricks The Devil in a variety of tales.  Barred from the afterlife he roams the world forever, carrying a single ember from the fires of Hell in his pumpkin lamp.

 

Read Full Post »

     Greetings Blogsprites!  Its October and autumn is well and truly underway.  This month folk at home, by the Land of Green Ginger, will be looking forward to our annual travelling fair and the usual Halloween celebrations.

     Here, at Lily Wight ~ The Arcade of Arts & Arcana, there’ll be things to make you go “ooh” – cute gifs, Lego art, the latest installment of our Wheel of The Year calendar – and things to make you go “AAAaaaarrrgggggghhhhhhh!!!” – a whole month of grim, gothic and generally spooky vamp things (or vampy spook things if you prefer) including art, books, graphic novels and the odd jack o’ lantern.

     Carved pumpkins won’t be the only form of illumination this month as we’ve also received a lovely Shine On blog award from http://modernoracletarot.com/.  If you enjoy the Tarot posts you find here you’ll enjoy Ronda Snow’s work too.

     Last, but not least, a huge thank you to 7,798 subscribers who read this blog over 9 syndicated sites and helped Lily Wight achieve a daily hits personal best with 3,427 visitors on September 17th.  Keep those comments coming everyone x

Dare you peek into the Macabre?

Read Full Post »

     Updated 23/09/2014

     The Wheel Of The Year calendar comprises four Celtic fire festivals interspersed with two solstice and two equinox celebrations.  September’s Equinox denotes the height of the Autumn season.

     The Autumn Equinox is named variably as Modron (Mother Goddess) or Mabon (Divine Son) – deities from Welsh Mythology who can be found in The Legends Of King Arthur.

     Modron is a harvest and fertility goddess who shares characteristics with the Roman Ceres.  On the agricultural calendar Lughnasadh (August) is The First Harvest (grains and cereals) and The Autumn Equinox (September) is The Second Harvest (fruits and vegetables).

     At the Equinox the year wanes, yet the harvest is plentiful.   The ancient tribal people of The Western Hemisphere believed their Mother Goddess entered the third trimester of her pregnancy whilst her divine consort prepares his descent to the wintry underworld.

     According to Arthurian Legend the fallen King Arthur is transported to Avalon, the “Isle Of Apples” to await his rebirth – an echo of the story of the dying god.  The Autumn Equinox is the best time for apple-picking and the fruit has come to have many sacred and mystical associations.

     Apples are used for a variety of regional folk customs, games and recipes at this time of year.  Slicing an apple across the middle reveals a pentacle or star – the symbol of man in harmony with the elements.

     Why not celebrate your Harvest Festival with some apple bobbing or by indulging in some candy apples?

 

Read Full Post »

     Updated 29/07/2014

     Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-na-sah) is one of eight festivals celebrated on the ancient Wheel Of The Year seasonal calendar.  It marks the midpoint between The Summer Solstice and The Autumn Equinox.  It was once observed when the first sheaf of corn was cut and now, most commonly, on 1st August.

     The First Harvest is named for the Irish Sun God, Lugh, who also lends his name to the Modern Irish name for August.  In Gaelic Mythology Lugh held a funeral and athletic games to honour his foster-mother, Tailtiu who died of exhaustion after clearing the land for agriculture.  Tailtiu represents an earth or harvest deity whose labours feed and nurture the people.

     At Lughnasadh tribal people throughout Western Europe and The Northern Hemisphere gave thanks for their grain and cereal harvest and sought blessings for next year’s crop.  The birth, death and rebirth of the cornfield was symbolic of the eternal cycle of all life.

     The Anglo-Saxons referred to The First Harvest as Hlaef-mass, meaning “loaf mass”.  Loaves would be baked in the shape of a corn god then broken and consumed to represent the blessings of his sacrifice.  The practice was adopted by modern Christians who refer to this festival as Lammas.

     Corn dollies, or spirit cages, are traditionally crafted at Lughnasadh to lure and capture crop spirits.  Combine this with the often misconstrued concept of sacrifice and you have the plot for The Wicker Man!

     It was common in agrarian societies for a god and goddess to marry at Beltane (1st May) and conceive a child to represent the new year and it’s harvest cycle.  In Folklore the father god “John Barleycorn” is “sacrificed” at Lughnasadh to nourish the bountiful goddess, her child and the people.  This is still reenacted today via the burning of a cornstalk effigy (not Edward Woodward).  Sometimes a bull would be sacrificed in the fields for a celebratory feast. 

     Today the people of Ireland still honour Lugh’s prowess by climbing closer to the sun, at the summit of Croagh Patrick in County Mayo, to gather bilberries for celebration foods and wine. 

Read Full Post »

2013-05-23-073     A brave and determined Yorkshire schoolboy is set to cycle an astonishing 75 miles to raise funds for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund (registered charity no. 1103253).

     Lex Stephenson, age 13, will be taking part in the Capital To Coast Cycle Challenge on Sunday 30th June 2013, starting at The London Eye and finishing at Brighton Pier.  Lex will be riding as part of a four man team, The Crazy Wheeler’s, with his Dad, his Uncle and his sixteen year old cousin.  The Wheelers were inspired to take part in the fundraising challenge after losing a family member to Pancreatic Cancer suddenly last year.

     Lex hopes his 75 mile journey will raise awareness of the vital need to fund research into cures for all types of cancer.  In 2004, when he was just four years old, Lex was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia and underwent a gruelling three years of continual chemotherapy treatment.  Despite great discomfort and long stays in hospital Lex continued to ride his bike regularly and believes that fresh air and exercise helped him to stay fit and keep positive throughout his illness and recuperation.  Lex remains in remission and celebrated the end of his treatment with a Star Wars Fundraising Party for Children With Cancer UK (registered charity no. 298405).

     During the last forty years survival rates for Childhood Leukaemia have risen from few to 80% whilst survival rates for Pancreatic Cancer remain low at just 3%.  Lex is now focusing his continuing fundraising efforts towards helping to beat a deadly disease in need of greater awareness.

     You can read about Lex’s bike ride challenge and support him with an immediate donation via the link below.  If everyone who reads his story shares it and donates £1 Lex will be well on his way to reaching his fundraising target.

Donate here ~ http://www.justgiving.com/Lex-Stephenson

Thank you 🙂

Related Links

Children With Cancer UK ~ Lex’s Story

Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund Website

Capital To Coast London To Brighton Charity Bike Ride Website

PLEASE SUPPORT LEX ON HIS CYCLE RIDE  ~ http://www.justgiving.com/Lex-Stephenson

Read Full Post »

     Updated 24/06/2014

     The ancient seasonal calendar – known as The Wheel Of The Year – has reached Litha (meaning “wheel”) also known as The Longest Day, Midsummer and The Summer Solstice.

     Litha marks the height of the sun’s powers at the middle of the year before the inevitable shortening of daylight hours.

     Midsummer has been observed since Neolithic times.  It held special significance to the Scandinavian, Germanic and Anglo-Saxon people and is still celebrated throughout The Northern Hemisphere today.

     Litha was a time to urge the growth of crops in the hope of a plentiful harvest.  A wheel would be set on fire and rolled downhill to “warm” the fields, a practice first recorded two thousand years ago.

     Golden-flowered  Midsummer plants, such as Calendula and St. John’s Wort were collected for their healing powers.

     According to ancient polytheist traditions The Antlered God – and his localised variant, The Green Man – reaches the height of his powers at the midpoint of the year whilst his Goddess consort carries the promise of renewal conceived during May’s Beltane celebrations.  This seasonal courtship was adapted by William Shakespeare in his play A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

     At Midsummer those living in the far Northern Hemisphere experience White Nights or The Midnight Sun as there is little if any darkness.  Families celebrate by heading out into the countryside; staying awake, lighting bonfires, feasting, drinking and enjoying saunas.

     Many stone circles throughout The United Kingdom are aligned to dawn at Midsummer and considered sacred to solar deities such as the Celtic Bel.  Celebrants gather at Stonehenge each year to drum the sun down at dusk and then up at dawn on The Longest Day.

Related Articles

Imbolc ~ The Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year

Ostara, The Spring Equinox ~ The Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year

Beltane ~ The Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year

Read Full Post »

     So here it is, our first look at the next installment of Peter Jackson’s Middle-earth multiplex pleaser.

     Despite the portentous dialogue snippets it seems much lighter than The Two Towers – a fellow sufferer of middle movie syndrome – and more action-oriented than it’s predecessor, The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey.

     When The Hobbit was first mooted Jackson declined the director’s chair, fearing perhaps that his confidence and experience would lead him to “do a George Lucas” and start tinkering self-indulgently and retconning his screen creation to its detriment.

     Alterations and additions are always necessary when adapting a story from one medium to the next but they are only truly successful if they integrate seamlessly with the original author’s vision:  we have a trailer that looks more like Peter Jackson’s Hobbit than Tolkien’s.

     If Jackson wants to make an Elf movie wouldn’t he be better adapting The Silmarillion?  Poor old Bilbo scarcely gets a look-in as we are treated to tree-running Timotei models who skid into shot with the enthusiasm of sugar-dosed kids on polished floors.  Back in his Rings days Jackson wisely cut leaked scenes of “Action Arwen” kicking Orc at Helm’s Deep after incurring the wrath of Tolkien fans.  Now it is hoped those same fans will accept original invention, Tauriel – a red-haired female Wood Elf who has achieved warrior status decades before poor Éowyn has to sneak off to Minas Tirith in drag.

     The biggest surprise is the full close-up reveal of Smaug’s head.  Despite the opportunity to allow the art department’s imagination to run riot the trailer delivers a very conventional-looking dragon – unless he’s hiding a serpentine body or a clockwork limb.  This may be a way to get the critique over and done with so, by December, audiences can relax and enjoy the flying, fire-breathing and vocal stylings of Benedict Cumberbatch.

     We revealed here some months ago that Cumberbatch had been cast as  Sauron The Necromancer (link to the article below) yet, whichever evil nasty he is portraying New Line seem desperate to keep Cumberbatch’s contributions under wraps.

     It’s nice to catch a glimpse of Luke Evans although such a pivotal character might have warranted a bigger fanfare and what about “sexy” Dwarf Kili – and all the other supporting Dwarves for that matter.  We need a longer trailer, but share your thoughts on this one while we wait…

Benedict Cumberbatch Is Sauron – Click to read.

Annatar ~ The Many Faces Of Sauron – Click to read.

Read Full Post »

     Some people dance around Maypoles or enjoy a day-trip to the seaside, if you’re a film fan however the Bank Holiday Weekend is all about May The Fourth or National Star Wars Day!

     Yorkshire-based special events company, Hullywood Entertainment will be hosting another of their famous Movie Buffs Collectors Fairs in the airy atrium of Prospect Shopping Centre (Kingston upon Hull, UK) on Saturday 4th May from 10am – 4pm.  Special guest, Ian Whyte – all seven-foot one of him – will be meeting guests and signing autographs.  Ian played the iconic Predator in Aliens vs. Predator (2004) and The Space Jockey in franchise revival Prometheus (2012).  Genre fans will also know him from Clash Of The Titans (2010) Harry Potter (2005) and his first dramatic role as Gregor Clegane “The Mountain That Rides” in HBO’s award-winning TV Show, Game Of Thrones.

     Britain’s Got Talent favourite, The Entertainer-nator – who reached the live semi-finals with his Arnold Schwarzenegger impersonation – will also be putting in an appearance, releasing his “Keith Lemon Clone” and treating fans to a few new characters.

     As well as the usual specialist stalls selling Movie, TV, Sci-Fi and Fantasy collectibles and memorabilia there will be opportunities to take photographs with a Back To The Future Replica DeLorean and a scaled-down Tim Burton style Batmobile complete with Hullywood Entertainment’s own Mini-Joker.  You can  get up close and personal with an amazing Captain Jack Sparrow Lookalike-Impersonator and view a variety of rare movie-themed props and exhibits.

     Ian Whyte will be supported by The UK Predators costume group.  The UK Garrison will be attending with a variety of costumed characters from the world of movies, games and television and, if you’re experiencing any problems with the paranormal, you’ll be able to consult costumers from the UK Ghostbusters.

     Attending Movie Buffs: May The Fourth in fancy dress is positively encouraged.  Children who attend the event in Star Wars themed costumes will gain free entry and there will be plenty of folk from the Hull Cosplayers group to show you how it’s done.

     The event marks the fifth anniversary of Hullywood Entertainment’s launch and The Force is sure to be with them!

Links for event information

Official Website  http://www.moviebuffs.co.uk/MovieBuffs/Home.html

Send a friend request on Facebook  https://www.facebook.com/hullywood.crew

Follow on Twitter  https://twitter.com/HullywoodCrew


Read Full Post »

     Updated 29/04/2014

     Beltane (meaning “bright fire”) or May Day is one of eight festival days marked upon the ancient seasonal calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.

     Beltane heralds the beginning of Summer as it lies halfway between The Spring Equinox (Ostara) and The Summer Solstice (Litha).  It is a time when daylight hours are long, trees blossom and herding animals are turned out to pasture.

     Beltane was originally observed by the Gaelic people of Ireland, Scotland and The Isle Of Man who performed protective rituals for their crops and livestock whilst The Celtic Tribes of Western Europe and Britain also celebrated mating rituals and male potency.

     Beltane is named for the Celtic Sun God, Bel (Belenos/Belenus) who is associated with West Cornwall, formerly Belerion.  The Romans dubbed him the “British Apollo” and – like many solar deities – he pulls the sun with his chariot and is associated with inspirational light and healing waters.

     Beltane also celebrates The Spirit Of The Greenwood in the guise of The Green Man; known variously as The Celtic Antlered-God Cernunnos, Herne The Hunter, Jack-In-The-Green and even Robin Hood.  Cernunnos consorts with The Mother Goddess at Beltane to assure the birth of the following Spring from the dead of Winter.

     Collecting May blossoms or “bringing in the May” is a euphemism for this time of sexual licence.  Beltane remains a popular time for marriage ceremonies and traditional handfastings.

     Jumping over a broomstick on May Day symbolises crossing the threshold from Spring to Summer and combines the masculine (handle) with the feminine (brush)… no sniggering at the back please 😉

     Dancing around Maypoles at Beltane is still practiced today throughout Europe, Scandinavia and The British Isles.  The origins of this tradition are lost but Folklorists believe the pole represents the ancient reverence for sacred trees or a phallic symbol!

     Pre-Roman tribes danced and walked themselves and their herds around or between protective Beltane fires.  These bonfire celebrations are enjoying a modern revival attracting fire-eaters and coal-walking.

The Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year

Imbolc (birth of Spring)

Ostara (Spring Equinox)

Related articles

Read Full Post »

     Updated 19/03/2015

     Ostara (Old High German) or Ēostre (Old English) falls upon 20th March.  It is one of eight ancient Wheel Of The Year festivals denoting seasonal shifts.

     Ostara marks The Vernal (meaning “youthful”) Equinox: the height of Spring.

     Daylight and darkness are balanced at The Equinox, prior to the lengthening of days: a period sometimes referred to as Lent.  It is a time to celebrate fecundity and growth.

     Ostara is named for an ancient Germanic goddess and the month that bears her name; Ôstarmânoth, now April.

     Ostara is a dawn goddess associated to the Greek Eos and the Roman Aurora.  She represents the resurrection of light following the death of Winter.

     Ostara’s totem animal is the hare: a symbol of fertility dating back to prehistoric times.  The hare was admired for its enthusiastic mating rituals and it’s associations to moon goddesses and the female reproductive cycle.

     Eggs are an ancient symbol of renewal, fertility and life-force.  They can be decorated to represent the wishes we hope will manifest in the coming summer.

     Eggs were used to play a number of festival games such as treasure hunts, races and relays (our modern egg and spoon race).

     Ostara is a solar festival so bonfires, hearth fires and candles can also be lit.

     The daffodil or “harbinger of Spring” is the traditional flower of the Ostara festival.

 

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »

%d bloggers like this: