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Posts Tagged ‘Fantasy’

Lily Wight

     Updated 05/03/2015

     The picture gallery at Lily Wight ~ The Arcade of Arts & Arcana is always open.  Click the tab at the top of the homepage to explore or just click Lily’s picture (below) for a shortcut 🙂

     Deviant Moon Tarot, The Eight of Cups by Patrick Valenza.

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Lily Wight

     Updated 09/10/2014

     Another full-length prose novel from (the admittedly deceased) J.R.R. Tolkien is too good to be true and infinitely more satisfying than all those collected fragments with endless footnotes.

     It’s business as usual with The Children Of Húrin as ancient oral-storytelling traditions pervade Tolkien’s reliably rich and evocative prose.

     Húrin has much in common with Norse dragon slayer Myths and is almost unbearably tragic.  It’s a great place to start with pre-Hobbit and Lord Of The Rings’ history and the maps and glossaries are essential – although why Tolkien is the only author who can get away with such things remains a mystery.

     It is a book to make you homesick for Middle-earth all over again.

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Lily Wight

Updated 03/05/2014

     Erikson is a writer at the top of his game with the fourth book of his Malazan series delivering more of the same and then some!

     Fans will be familiar with the author’s distinct style and structure featuring unlikely pairings undertaking strange journeys that impact upon the martial and political landscape in unexpected ways.

     Erikson’s tales mimic the evolution of real history so those who prefer traditional quest-driven yarns may feel frustrated by the lack of conclusions.  There is however a realism and sense of immediacy seldom achieved by the Fantasy genre.

     House of Chains concludes most of The Whirlwind Rebellion plot and getting there is a brilliant, challenging and addictive read.

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Lily Wight

     Updated 14/04/2014

     The third novel in the Malazan Cycle suffers the same highs and lows as its predecessor.  The first half is over-plotted and over-populated, more of an endurance test than an entertaining read.

     Once various subplots unite, for a spectacular midway siege, Erikson shifts up a league and delivers martial action and emotional character beats with familiar aplomb.

     Erikson’s enthusiasm for his secondary world is infectious, but his pacing and structure continue to irritate.

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Lily Wight

     Updated 07/04/2014

     Too many new faces and places sap momentum in this now sprawling Fantasy series.

     Erikson’s prose has a captivating quality which will win patience from his readership but many sub-plots seem circular and unnecessary.  Characters are absent for several chapters so, by the time they return, you are likely to have forgotten who they are and what they are doing whilst the unceremonious dumping of a hugely important plot revelation is unforgivably clumsy.

     Erikson’s system of magic use seems over-complicated and only partially formed, suggesting a world and a plot which is dangerously close to escaping the clutches of its author.

     Erikson is at his best when describing martial combat and strategy.  His central plot thread, the imperiled exodus of refugees, is strong enough without extraneous sub-stories.  Erikson’s promise is unmistakable but he…

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Lily Wight

      Updated 29/03/2014    

      Forget polite introductions and sedate world-building because Erikson’s opener is a merciless drag through war, politics, questing and magic which may swamp and baffle less dedicated Fantasy fans.

     Gardens of the Moon may be overpopulated and over-plotted but Erikson holds chaos at bay with genius page-turning prose and infectious enthusiasm.

     With a little more focus and honing the Malazan Books could achieve brilliance.

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Lily Wight

     Updated 06/03/2014

     Here is an early Easter Egg for you, crack it open and you will find a golden and glowing review of John Connolly’s The Book of Lost Things…

   

      It is hard to beat Angela Carter’s potent re-imaginings of traditional Fairy Tales but John Connolly may boast a valiant and successful attempt.

     Young hero, David’s struggle to adjust to his step-family under the shadow of The Blitz is realistic and heartfelt but unfortunately the tone alters and the pace flounders during a flabby middle section inspired by tired and predictable medieval quest romances.

     Connolly’s work suffers a little under too many influences; Narnia, Oz, Wonderland, Labyrinth and even The Box of Delights are all thrown into the mix.  Focus is restored most triumphantly however in a dramatic ending which…

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