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Posts Tagged ‘Gothic’

Lily Wight

     John Polidori (1795 – 1821) is best remembered as Lord Byron’s travelling companion and personal physician but his short story, The Vampyre (1819) is the first significant vampire tale in English Literature, following on from Lady Caroline Lamb’s less revered Gothic Novel, Glenarvon (1816).

     The Vampyre is rather prosaic and melodramatic for modern tastes yet its brevity and vital role in vampire mythology make it an essential read.  The Vampyre himself, Lord Ruthven, is the original frilly-cuffed brooding immortal; a character endowed with the dangerous dilettantism associated with the Romantic writers and artists who, for many, have come to define the tastes, fashions and attitudes of the Georgian era.  Ruthven’s style of vampirism bridges the gap between the demons and monsters of folklore and the modern vampire anti-hero with his magnetic charisma and troubled conscience.  This new archetype was later perfected and explored by…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 16/09/2014

     The episodic structure and super simple YA-style prose mire a book worth reading for its genius premise: pensioners battling the supernatural in UK Goth Capital, Whitby.

     Magrs inventively homages all the genre classics with warmth and wit whilst Brenda and Effie disguise cracks in an episodic narrative with the sheer force of their personalities.  Two great roles for Dames Judi Dench and Helen Mirren perhaps 🙂

     A silly, frothy yarn perfect for Sunday tea time telly.

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Lily Wight

Updated 03/06/2014

     Despite obvious extensive research and the Stoker seal of approval belated Dracula sequel Dracula The Un-Dead is a wasted opportunity which panders to modern tastes instead of keeping faith with the original vampire classic.

     Dacre Stoker and collaborator Ian Holt throw in everything from Elizabeth Bathory and Jack The Ripper to The Titanic creating a convoluted yarn which, although fast paced, struggles to find themes and focus.

     This sort of  Victorian Gothic Alternative History, or Literary Re-imagining, has been done far more successfully before by author Kim Newman whose Anno Dracula series is both effortless and ingenious in its use of similar settings and characters.

     The Un-Dead reads more like a sequel to Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula movie and when Dracula intones to Mina’s son “I am your father!!!” you may just die…

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Lily Wight

     A “subtle” hint of Literary misogyny has confined Carmilla to countless Hammer-style lesbian vampire flicks yet J. Sheridan Le Fanu’s perfectly executed short novel (1872) preceded Bram Stoker’s Dracula by a good twenty years.

     Many familiar folkloric traditions were collected and presented here first, so Le Fanu’s tale has lost non of its relevance.  The foggy Eastern European locales, racing horse-drawn carriages, suspicious locals and masquerade balls are all present and continue to contribute to the variable laws of vampirism.
     The prose is fast-paced and contemporary with a tantalising cinematic quality.  Taut with tension and genuinely chilling Carmilla deserves just as much adoration as The Count!

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Lily Wight

     Updated 16/10/13

When bookshops are heaving with Twilight knock-offs it’s a travesty that this superb novel is out of print in the UK  and had to be sourced secondhand, from overseas.”

     At least that is what a certain reviewer (ahem) said the last time they considered Kim Newman’s superlative Anno Dracula – the first book in a truly diverse, enlightening and remarkable series.  Since then Newman’s twenty-two year old vampire novel has received a  well deserved new edition and relaunch to go with its brand new sequel, Johnny Alucard (2013).
     Part Dracula sequel, part alternative history, Anno Dracula is a tour-de-force of literary and historical research enlivened by Newman’s light touch and rich detail.   Fans of The Age of Empire will enjoy recognising and sourcing the characters and events which are effortlessly woven into an…

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     There are some brand new images of Little Red Riding Hood available now at Lily Wight ~ The Arcade of Arts & Arcana Gallery.

     Here are a selected few to fire your imagination, click the link at the end for more…

View the full collection here

Browse the Gallery here

 

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     View in full Zealous Creative’s wonderful Stop Motion short, The Maker (2011).

     Written and directed by Christopher Kezelos.

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     If you dust-off June in The Arcade Of Arts & Arcana’s Archives (head to the sidebar on the homepage) you’ll find Pre-Raphaelite strumpets, naughty vintage movies some ridiculous facts about the Victorian Era and a popular post on that favourite guilty pleasure – Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula (click the link to read the original post).

     Perhaps it was Eiko Ishioka’s demonic raw-muscle armour that made the post so popular.  You can see it again here along with more of Ishioka’s Oscar-winning costumes for Gary Oldman…

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     Only five sleeps until Halloween, Blogsprites!

     Here are some amazing images from the Gallery album ~ Grand Guignol.  Click them to see more…

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     First came the Vampires, now Werewolves are rampaging through The Arcade Of Arts & Arcana Gallery.

     If you are brave enough click on the homepage Gallery tab or the pictures below…

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     Updated 16/09/2014

     The episodic structure and super simple YA-style prose mire a book worth reading for its genius premise: pensioners battling the supernatural in UK Goth Capital, Whitby.

     Magrs inventively homages all the genre classics with warmth and wit whilst Brenda and Effie disguise cracks in an episodic narrative with the sheer force of their personalities.  Two great roles for Dames Judi Dench and Helen Mirren perhaps 🙂

     A silly, frothy yarn perfect for Sunday tea time telly.

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     It’s all treats and no tricks at Lily Wight ~ The Arcade Of Arts & Arcana this month!

     The new image album, Grand Guignol, is now available to view via the Gallery tab at  https://lilywight.com/ or just click the pics for a fast pass 🙂

     Here are a few vampires to get you started…

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     It’s October, Blogsprites!  The Witching Month.  The season of Samhain (that’s sow – inn to non-Celts) or Halloween!

     All this month Lily Wight ~ The Arcade Of Arts & Arcana will be dedicated to things Gothic, Supernatural and generally pant-wetting so grab your favourite comfort-cushion and join me behind the settee.

     Art, books and movies will be here as usual, I may just get around to posting that Autumn Equinox Tarot spread and I’ve got 7 lovely Kreativ Blogger Awards to give away.

     Keep following, keep sharing and look me up on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest for blog post notifications and extra trick or treat goodies xxx

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Amazing Tim Burtonesque Pokémon. A perfect start for a Gothic October!

 

Banana Scoop

Crazy awesome artist Hatboy, had combined something truly awesome.  Tim Burton gothic style art and Pokemon.  Luckily, this guy is from my generation and he seems to be using the first 150 as his content material.  As you can see from above, he takes a popular Pokemon type and redraws them with Tim Burton trademark creepy features and distinct art style…I can’t seem to find another word for it besides gothic and I keep wanting to use Corpse Bridey/Nightmare Before Christmasy.  You can check out the entire gallery through his link where he does way more than some of the ones I featured here.  Go on below to check out the rest of my favorites.

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     Here is just a sneaky peek at some of the amazing new pictures added to the Gallery at www.lilywight.com

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     Count Dracula (alongside fellow Victorian gentleman, Sherlock Holmes) holds the dubious honour of being the Movie World’s hardest working (and most abused) literary character.

     Francis Ford Coppola’s 1992 adaptation is a gloriously bombastic mountain of soft-focus eroto-nonsense but a highly recommended guilty pleasure.

     Coppola claimed that his version would be the closest ever interpretation of Stoker’s classic novel but his attempts to include every character whilst frequently switching narrative perspective makes for a cluttered and unfocused movie.  Dracula is depicted in his numerous evolving guises but the inclusion of a psuedo-historical prologue forces a new reincarnation theme on the tale.

     Dracula was released just prior to Neil Jordan’s adaptation of  Interview With The Vampire and has too much in common with Anne Rice’s genre-changing interpretation of vampire archetypes as immortal dreamboats.  Coppola’s film oozes lush Freudian imagery; sinking suns, blood cells, eyes, nipples and fragrant blooms are everywhere.

     Oldman himself admitted to essaying Dracula as “a Fallen Angel” and the beloved actor deserves much credit for creating a tour-de-force (and cohesive) performance with a role that required him to play a medieval relic, a romantic Victorian Prince, a wolfman, a bat and just about every stage in between.

     His Eastern European accent is sublime or ridiculous but unforgettable either way.  Many have forgotten that he was nominated for an Oscar for this role.  As a Fantasy character he was never likely to win (even The Lord Of The Rings failed to gain plaudits for its cast) but his creation is every bit as unique as Depp’s Jack Sparrow.

     Rumour has it that Winona Ryder petitioned hard to have her then boyfriend Johnny Depp cast as Jonathan Harker.  Depp fans would no doubt love to have seen this but it is hard to imagine how he could have improved or altered the end result.  Some films are actually enhanced by unintentional comedy moments.  Keanu Reeves is one long comedy moment.   It is enough that Reeves is simply awful and memorable (with a grey streak that turns into a continuity nightmare and helpfully distracts from his lack of performance).

     Perhaps it is time to watch Coppola’s Dracula again.  The set and costume designs are lavish, Lucy’s beheading has genuine chills, Antony Hopkins goes all out to match Oldman’s Method mania and the orchestral score is magnificent.

     It’s guilty, yes…but pleasurable.

 

 

     Click for another post you might like 🙂

 

  

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Memento Mori

love this group, follow the link for more info on them

“La Luz De Jesus Gallery proudly rebrands our annual juried group exhibition, LALUZAPALOOZA. This gigantic, no-theme show features works from some of the freshest and most relevant artists working today. Over 9,000 submissions from commercial illustrators, graphic designers, tattooists, scenics, students, animators and working gallery artists had to be sorted-through, and we’ve finally narrowed it down to 125 or so artists. The official piece count is awaiting verification, but you can bet that it will be another (tastefully) jam-packed, salon-style exhibition. There are some familiar names from our ever-growing roster of feature artists, but an overwhelming percentage of the work comes from a brand new batch of undiscovered, emerging talent.!

http://www.laluzdejesus.com/shows/2012/Kitschen-Sync/Laluzapalooza2012-index.htm

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Updated 03/06/2014

     Despite obvious extensive research and the Stoker seal of approval belated Dracula sequel Dracula The Un-Dead is a wasted opportunity which panders to modern tastes instead of keeping faith with the original vampire classic.

     Dacre Stoker and collaborator Ian Holt throw in everything from Elizabeth Bathory and Jack The Ripper to The Titanic creating a convoluted yarn which, although fast paced, struggles to find themes and focus.

     This sort of  Victorian Gothic Alternative History, or Literary Re-imagining, has been done far more successfully before by author Kim Newman whose Anno Dracula series is both effortless and ingenious in its use of similar settings and characters.

     The Un-Dead reads more like a sequel to Francis Ford Coppola’s Dracula movie and when Dracula intones to Mina’s son “I am your father!!!” you may just die laughing.

     A fun read, but shouldn’t this have been a modern-day classic?

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     Updated 15/05/2014

     A “subtle” hint of Literary misogyny has confined Carmilla to countless Hammer-style lesbian vampire flicks yet J. Sheridan Le Fanu’s perfectly executed short novel (1872) preceded Bram Stoker’s Dracula by a good twenty years.

     Many familiar folkloric traditions were collected and presented here first, so Le Fanu’s tale has lost non of its relevance.  The foggy Eastern European locales, racing horse-drawn carriages, suspicious locals and masquerade balls are all present and continue to contribute to the variable laws of vampirism.
     The prose is fast-paced and contemporary with a tantalising cinematic quality.  Taut with tension and genuinely chilling Carmilla deserves just as much adoration as The Count!

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Storm Corrosion

Thanks for introducing me to Storm Corrosion. It’s the video that caught my eye – amazing animation, I’m sure my visitors will love it (or have sleepless nights!).

Adrenochrome Music

Here as promised.

As with any Supergroup or side project involving big names there is the added pressure to succeed or at least, you’d hope, sound good. Metallica and Lou Reed failed at even this, most pedestrian of accomplishments. Chickenfoot, Black Country Communion and Adrenaline Mob are all concurrent bands among many that have stared down the barrel of Supergroup hype. Storm Corrosion fits into this bracket nicely as it contains two giant names and has, it seems, been on tips of many tongues now for three or four years, and briefly on Mike Portnoy’s until he was once again left out in the cold.

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Amazing!

Country & Victorian Times

Although this is a bit different from what I usually post, I came upon this picture on the internet and just had to share. I have read and watched a lot on the subject of the undead and vampires, and even read about this cage over graves before. However, I have never actually seen a picture of one before and found it unique. So, I know what your asking, “so what does this have to do with this site and why is it posted?” Well, it has to do with the Victorian era and all of their superstitions and what we now know of as irrational fears.

The caged grave as seen above was used to prevent one of two things. 1: If you were to come back alive and become a walking undead then you wouldn’t be able to remove yourself from this cage and you could be dealt…

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Well, it’s just perfect isn’t it? xx Thank you G of G x

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I admire your hardcore reading ethos so I would love to present you with THE VERSATILE BLOGGER AWARD. For information on what to do next click the link in my homepage sidebar. Congratulations!

Cannonball Read IV

I have always harbored an interest in canonical vampire stories, and yet I’d never read any of the Rice Vampire Chronicles. Interview with the Vampire is the first of the Chronicles, and it’s the first of the three that I plan to read (having heard that they decline in quality after Queen of the Damned.) But that’s a discussion for another day.

Interview is written as a memoir of sorts, an account of vampire Louis’ life as he tells it to a mortal boy who records his narrative. The basic outline of Louis’ story is that he is turned in New Orleans by the vampire Lestat, and Louis hereafter searches New Orleans and Europe for answers regarding his vampire nature, and vampire origins. His adventure has several phases that are largely determined by who his immortal companion is at the time: his time in New Orleans is primarily spent…

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     Updated 15/03/2014

TeacupTease

Hey everyone, this is a blog that will talk in general about fashion, t-shirt design, and the small business that I own (teacuptease) with my girlfriend (Taylor). A little about the direction of our shop, we are vintage clothing, as well as accessories, t-shirts we designed ourselves, and clothing that has been made a piece of art (pic related).

Taylors skeleton dress [sold]:
Image

For a look at some of the current dresses/inventory at our shop, here is the etsy url: http://www.etsy.com/shop/teacuptease

Thanks for reading!

-Edin

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     Dear Blogsprites,

     I cannot recommend this film highly enough, it’s an absolute favourite!

     Charlize Theron certainly has her work cut out attempting to out-wicked Sigourney Weaver!

     

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