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Posts Tagged ‘Life’

     The Autumn Equinox marks the annual fruit and vegetable harvest and is the season best known for apple-picking.

     According to Arthurian Tradition the fallen King Arthur was transported to Avalon – “The Isle of Apples” – symbolising winter death and the promise of rebirth in spring.

     Click the link below to discover more about this Wheel of The Year festival…

https://lilywight.com/2013/09/25/modron-the-autumn-equinox-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

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     You can call it Midsummer, The Longest Day, Litha or The Summer Solstice.  Whichever you prefer just click the link to read all about it in our popular guide to The Wheel of The Year festivals…

https://lilywight.com/2013/06/20/litha-the-summer-solstice-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

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     How will you celebrate your May Day bank holiday weekend?  You could always get married, jump over a broomstick or get naked and paint yourself red like these folks.

     You can discover the origins and traditions of the Beltane festival by clicking the link below for Lily Wight’s Beginner’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year.

Beltane Fire Festival

https://lilywight.com/2013/05/01/beltane-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

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     Ostara is an Anglo-Germanic fertility festival celebrated at The Spring Equinox.  This year’s festival coincides with a rare solar eclipse on Friday 20th March.  Click the link to read all about it in Lily Wight’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year.

 

https://lilywight.com/2013/03/20/ostara-spring-equinox-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

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     The Celtic Fire Festival, Imbolc is celebrated on the 1st of February.  Click the link to read all about it in Lily Wight’s Guide To The Wheel Of The Year.

 

 https://lilywight.com/2013/02/02/imbolc-the-beginners-guide-to-the-wheel-of-the-year/

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Lily Wight

     Samhain – pronounced “sow – inn” and known presently as Halloween – is celebrated from sunset to sunset on 31st October to 1st November.  It is the most important Fire Festival or Sabbat on the ancient Wheel of The Year calendar.

     “Samhain” has been variously translated as “first frost” or “Summer’s end”:  opposing suggestions with the same meaning.  It is the name for November in ancient and modern Gaelic.

     Samhain lies between The Autumn Equinox and The Winter Solstice.  It marks the death of the year and the end of the annual agricultural cycle.  Many ancient cultures throughout The Western Hemisphere regarded Samhain as their New Year’s Eve.

     Samhain is the third and final harvest on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  After Lughnasadh (grain and cereals) and Modron (fruit and vegetables) herding communities drove livestock back from…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 23/09/2014

     The Wheel Of The Year calendar comprises four Celtic fire festivals interspersed with two solstice and two equinox celebrations.  September’s Equinox denotes the height of the Autumn season.

     The Autumn Equinox is named variably as Modron (Mother Goddess) or Mabon (Divine Son) – deities from Welsh Mythology who can be found in The Legends Of King Arthur.

     Modron is a harvest and fertility goddess who shares characteristics with the Roman Ceres.  On the agricultural calendar Lughnasadh (August) is The First Harvest (grains and cereals) and The Autumn Equinox (September) is The Second Harvest (fruits and vegetables).

     At the Equinox the year wanes, yet the harvest is plentiful.   The ancient tribal people of The Western Hemisphere believed their Mother Goddess entered the third trimester of her pregnancy whilst her…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 29/07/2014

     Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-na-sah) is one of eight festivals celebrated on the ancient Wheel Of The Year seasonal calendar.  It marks the midpoint between The Summer Solstice and The Autumn Equinox.  It was once observed when the first sheaf of corn was cut and now, most commonly, on 1st August.

     The First Harvest is named for the Irish Sun God, Lugh, who also lends his name to the Modern Irish name for August.  In Gaelic Mythology Lugh held a funeral and athletic games to honour his foster-mother, Tailtiu who died of exhaustion after clearing the land for agriculture.  Tailtiu represents an earth or harvest deity whose labours feed and nurture the people.

     At Lughnasadh tribal people throughout Western Europe and The Northern Hemisphere gave thanks for their grain and cereal harvest and sought blessings for…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 24/06/2014

     The ancient seasonal calendar – known as The Wheel Of The Year – has reached Litha (meaning “wheel”) also known as The Longest Day, Midsummer and The Summer Solstice.

     Litha marks the height of the sun’s powers at the middle of the year before the inevitable shortening of daylight hours.

     Midsummer has been observed since Neolithic times.  It held special significance to the Scandinavian, Germanic and Anglo-Saxon people and is still celebrated throughout The Northern Hemisphere today.

     Litha was a time to urge the growth of crops in the hope of a plentiful harvest.  A wheel would be set on fire and rolled downhill to “warm” the fields, a practice first recorded two thousand years ago.

     Golden-flowered  Midsummer plants, such as Calendula and St. John’s…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 29/04/2014

     Beltane (meaning “bright fire”) or May Day is one of eight festival days marked upon the ancient seasonal calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.

     Beltane heralds the beginning of Summer as it lies halfway between The Spring Equinox (Ostara) and The Summer Solstice (Litha).  It is a time when daylight hours are long, trees blossom and herding animals are turned out to pasture.

     Beltane was originally observed by the Gaelic people of Ireland, Scotland and The Isle Of Man who performed protective rituals for their crops and livestock whilst The Celtic Tribes of Western Europe and Britain also celebrated mating rituals and male potency.

     Beltane is named for the Celtic Sun God, Bel (Belenos/Belenus) who is associated with West Cornwall, formerly Belerion.  The Romans dubbed him the “British Apollo” and…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 15/03/2014

     Ostara (Old High German) or Ēostre (Old English) falls upon 20th March.  It is one of eight ancient Wheel Of The Year festivals denoting seasonal shifts.

     Ostara marks The Vernal (meaning “youthful”) Equinox: the height of Spring.

     Daylight and darkness are balanced at The Equinox, prior to the lengthening of days: a period sometimes referred to as Lent.  It is a time to celebrate fecundity and growth.

     Ostara is named for an ancient Germanic goddess and the month that bears her name; Ôstarmânoth, now April.

     Ostara is a dawn goddess associated to the Greek Eos and the Roman Aurora.  She represents the resurrection of light following the death of Winter.

     Ostara’s totem animal is the hare: a symbol of fertility dating…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 28/02/2014

     Would you believe that Lily Wight ~ The Arcade of Arts & Arcana is two years old today or 2,344 comments, 411 posts and over 10,500 subscribers old today!

If you are already a blog author or reader, or you are thinking about becoming one, a glance below – at this site’s very first technophobic and mildly apologetic post – will prove that award-winning, international blogs can evolve from humble origins and perseverance to recommendations by best-selling authors.

     Would you like to re-share the moment you lost your blog virginity?  Lily Wight will show you hers if you show her yours 😉

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     Dear Blogsprites,

     I always thought that keyboards were for making music and that hard-drives were arduous road-trips.

     As soon as I…

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     Directed by Paul Leeson Taylor in association with FLUXOne20 for South Yorkshire Police, UK.  Featuring young actors from Hull, City of Culture 2017.

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Lily Wight

     Updated for 2015

     Imbolc (pronounced i-MOLK meaning “in the belly”) is one of eight seasonal festivals marked on the ancient calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.  Imbolc is observed on 1st February each year.

     Imbolc heralds the first stirrings of  Spring as it lies halfway between The Winter Solstice (Yule) and The Spring Equinox (Ostara).  It is a time when days lengthen, new buds and shoots appear and the first lambs are born.

     Imbolc was originally observed by the Gaelic (Irish, Scottish and Manx) people as a vital indicator of a new agricultural year.

     The festival was deemed sacred to the Gaelic goddess Brighid (pronounced breed) the midwife of the year and protector of women, children and newborns. 

     Hearthfire celebrations involved the baking of bannocks; the origin…

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     Darth Vader knows what you’ve got for Christmas – he felt your presents – and he’s on his way to East Yorkshire, UK to offer film fans the opportunity to solve all their festive gift needs.

     Movie Buffs Christmas Special is the latest event organised by Hullywood Entertainment and due to be held over two days, at Hull’s Princes Quay Shopping Centre, on Saturday 30th November and Sunday 1st December 2013.

     The Christmas Special will be Hullywood’s eighth collectors’ fair and promises dozens of trade stalls offering unique, rare, new and vintage memorabilia.

     Special guest, Rusty Goffe will be in attendance, signing autographs and sharing his anecdotes and experiences on both days.  Rusty continues to enjoy a long and distinguished career in films and television and has appeared as a Jawa in the original Star Wars Trilogy and an Oompa Loompa in Willy Wonka & The Chocolate Factory.  Younger fans will know Rusty as a Gringott’s Goblin from the Harry Potter movies.

     The Movie Buffs Christmas Special will also feature a variety of exhibition props, costume groups, cosplay and face-painting.  For more information and to keep up-to-date with Hullywood Entertainment news and events send a Facebook friend request to Hullywood Crew or follow @HullywoodCrew on Twitter.

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     Updated 23/10/2014

     Samhain – pronounced “sow – inn” and known presently as Halloween – is celebrated from sunset to sunset on 31st October to 1st November.  It is the most important Fire Festival or Sabbat on the ancient Wheel of The Year calendar.

     “Samhain” has been variously translated as “first frost” or “Summer’s end”:  opposing suggestions with the same meaning.  It is the name for November in ancient and modern Gaelic.

     Samhain lies between The Autumn Equinox and The Winter Solstice.  It marks the death of the year and the end of the annual agricultural cycle.  Many ancient cultures throughout The Western Hemisphere regarded Samhain as their New Year’s Eve.

     Samhain is the third and final harvest on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  After Lughnasadh (grain and cereals) and Modron (fruit and vegetables) herding communities drove livestock back from Summer pasture to be housed or slaughtered for winter, furthering the festival’s associations with death.  The eighth century scholar, Bede refers to November as the “blood month”.

     According to ancient beliefs the mythic courtship of a god and goddess symbolised the eternal rotation of seasons.  At Samhain the Goddess, in her crone or hag aspect, midwifes the waning or sacrificed God into the Underworld where he will journey until his rebirth at Yule with the promise of Spring. 

     Crone Goddesses, such as Celtic Ceridwen and Greek Hecate, ease transitions and guard borders and crossroads.  They are keepers of arcane wisdom and herbal lore who are associated with broomsticks (for cleansing thresholds) and cauldrons (for brewing natural medicines).  Halloween “witches” are a modern remnant of this frequently misunderstood ancient archetype.

     Sexy Halloween witches owe their style to The Morrígan, the Gaelic Dark Mother or Raven Goddess  who presides over death and battle – akin to the Scandinavian Valkyries.  At Samhain The Morrígan mates with The Dagda (the Gaelic All-Father) to bring creation from chaos.

     Samhain is considered a liminal time; when the veil between the mortal and the preternatural realms – the living and the dead – is at its thinnest.  Ancestors are remembered and honoured with a variety of worldwide customs that continue to this day, such as the Mexican Dia de Los Meurtos or Day of The Dead.

     Costuming for Halloween is an ancient tradition with many possible origins and purposes.  Celebrants may have daubed themselves with ash from ritual bonfires or disguised themselves to confuse, deter or even consort with mischievous otherworldly creatures before parading from house to house to collect donations for the Samhain feast: the likely origin of trick or treating.

     It wouldn’t be Samhain without a pumpkin lantern.  The gourd was the first domesticated plant species and has been used for carving for thousands of years.  Pumpkin lamps were carved with fearsome faces as festival decorations; to light parades and repel unwelcome spirits.  Jack o’ Lantern was another name for will-o’-the-wisp; strange but naturally occurring flares of marsh gas.  Jack o’ Lantern evolved into a folkloric hero who tricks The Devil in a variety of tales.  Barred from the afterlife he roams the world forever, carrying a single ember from the fires of Hell in his pumpkin lamp.

 

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     Greetings Blogsprites!  Its October and autumn is well and truly underway.  This month folk at home, by the Land of Green Ginger, will be looking forward to our annual travelling fair and the usual Halloween celebrations.

     Here, at Lily Wight ~ The Arcade of Arts & Arcana, there’ll be things to make you go “ooh” – cute gifs, Lego art, the latest installment of our Wheel of The Year calendar – and things to make you go “AAAaaaarrrgggggghhhhhhh!!!” – a whole month of grim, gothic and generally spooky vamp things (or vampy spook things if you prefer) including art, books, graphic novels and the odd jack o’ lantern.

     Carved pumpkins won’t be the only form of illumination this month as we’ve also received a lovely Shine On blog award from http://modernoracletarot.com/.  If you enjoy the Tarot posts you find here you’ll enjoy Ronda Snow’s work too.

     Last, but not least, a huge thank you to 7,798 subscribers who read this blog over 9 syndicated sites and helped Lily Wight achieve a daily hits personal best with 3,427 visitors on September 17th.  Keep those comments coming everyone x

Dare you peek into the Macabre?

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     Updated 23/09/2014

     The Wheel Of The Year calendar comprises four Celtic fire festivals interspersed with two solstice and two equinox celebrations.  September’s Equinox denotes the height of the Autumn season.

     The Autumn Equinox is named variably as Modron (Mother Goddess) or Mabon (Divine Son) – deities from Welsh Mythology who can be found in The Legends Of King Arthur.

     Modron is a harvest and fertility goddess who shares characteristics with the Roman Ceres.  On the agricultural calendar Lughnasadh (August) is The First Harvest (grains and cereals) and The Autumn Equinox (September) is The Second Harvest (fruits and vegetables).

     At the Equinox the year wanes, yet the harvest is plentiful.   The ancient tribal people of The Western Hemisphere believed their Mother Goddess entered the third trimester of her pregnancy whilst her divine consort prepares his descent to the wintry underworld.

     According to Arthurian Legend the fallen King Arthur is transported to Avalon, the “Isle Of Apples” to await his rebirth – an echo of the story of the dying god.  The Autumn Equinox is the best time for apple-picking and the fruit has come to have many sacred and mystical associations.

     Apples are used for a variety of regional folk customs, games and recipes at this time of year.  Slicing an apple across the middle reveals a pentacle or star – the symbol of man in harmony with the elements.

     Why not celebrate your Harvest Festival with some apple bobbing or by indulging in some candy apples?

 

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     Movie fans may sense a serious disturbance in The Force this Saturday when Darth Vader’s shuttle arrives at Hull’s Movie Buffs Collectors Fair.

     Actor Dave Prowse, who gave Darth Vader his imposing presence in the original Star Wars Trilogy, will be visiting the city for the very first time to meet fans, sign autographs and enjoy some Yorkshire hospitality.

     The former Green Cross Code Man will be joined by special effects gurus and Jabba The Hutt puppeteers, Toby Philpott and John Coppinger, who have worked on a variety of memorable movies including Harry Potter, Labyrinth and The Dark Crystal.

     Movie Buffs is the seventh film and cult TV fair hosted by Hullywood Entertainment, an independent Yorkshire-based events company launched five years ago with support from The Prince’s Trust.

     This Saturday’s event will be held in the first floor atrium of Hull’s Prospect Shopping Centre from 10am – 4pm and will also feature a spectacular array of trade stands and exhibits.  Charity costume groups, such as the world-renowned UK Garrison and the UK Ghostbusters will be mingling with visitors alongside a variety of cosplayers.  Movie Buffs events have become well-known for their party atmosphere and visitors are always welcome to turn-up in fancy dress.

     Tickets for Movie Buffs, Hull 17/08/2013 are available on the door.

Click here for further information http://moviebuffs.co.uk/MovieBuffs/Home.html

Send Hullywood Crew a friend request or follow for regular news and updates https://www.facebook.com/hullywood.crew

Hullywood Crew on Twitter https://twitter.com/HullywoodCrew

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     Updated 29/07/2014

     Lughnasadh (pronounced Loo-na-sah) is one of eight festivals celebrated on the ancient Wheel Of The Year seasonal calendar.  It marks the midpoint between The Summer Solstice and The Autumn Equinox.  It was once observed when the first sheaf of corn was cut and now, most commonly, on 1st August.

     The First Harvest is named for the Irish Sun God, Lugh, who also lends his name to the Modern Irish name for August.  In Gaelic Mythology Lugh held a funeral and athletic games to honour his foster-mother, Tailtiu who died of exhaustion after clearing the land for agriculture.  Tailtiu represents an earth or harvest deity whose labours feed and nurture the people.

     At Lughnasadh tribal people throughout Western Europe and The Northern Hemisphere gave thanks for their grain and cereal harvest and sought blessings for next year’s crop.  The birth, death and rebirth of the cornfield was symbolic of the eternal cycle of all life.

     The Anglo-Saxons referred to The First Harvest as Hlaef-mass, meaning “loaf mass”.  Loaves would be baked in the shape of a corn god then broken and consumed to represent the blessings of his sacrifice.  The practice was adopted by modern Christians who refer to this festival as Lammas.

     Corn dollies, or spirit cages, are traditionally crafted at Lughnasadh to lure and capture crop spirits.  Combine this with the often misconstrued concept of sacrifice and you have the plot for The Wicker Man!

     It was common in agrarian societies for a god and goddess to marry at Beltane (1st May) and conceive a child to represent the new year and it’s harvest cycle.  In Folklore the father god “John Barleycorn” is “sacrificed” at Lughnasadh to nourish the bountiful goddess, her child and the people.  This is still reenacted today via the burning of a cornstalk effigy (not Edward Woodward).  Sometimes a bull would be sacrificed in the fields for a celebratory feast. 

     Today the people of Ireland still honour Lugh’s prowess by climbing closer to the sun, at the summit of Croagh Patrick in County Mayo, to gather bilberries for celebration foods and wine. 

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     Spamming, trolling, fan baiting and forum wars can make the internet a hostile place so congratulations to the following Inner Peace Award winners for creating some beautiful blog spaces 🙂

http://joannafay.me/

http://purplerays.wordpress.com/

http://aristonorganic.wordpress.com/

http://graveology.com/

http://skm1963.wordpress.com/

http://lesleycarter.wordpress.com/

http://urbanwallart.wordpress.com/

     Well done everybody, here are my refined, abridged and preferred Blog Award Rules.

     1.  Display the award certificate on your website.

     2.  Announce your win with a post and include a link to whoever presented your award.

     3.  Present 7 awards to deserving bloggers.  Create a post linking to them and drop them a comment to tip them off.

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     The greatest gift is the surprise you didn’t know you needed; so gracious thanks to shiny Summer, Contributing Editor at Grow Your Innerself, for the Inner Peace Award with the accompanying words ~

Sweet you,

I’ve an award for you, for the person who you are and the things you share with the world.

Thank you for that..

Namasté, Summer

     Namasté indeed 🙂

     We’ll be awarding a little more peace to bloggers who create beautiful spaces on the web next month!

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     A determined family of Yorkshire cyclists conquered rolling hills, slipped chains and a puncture to complete a gruelling 75 mile bike marathon.

1044375_665159336831332_1503137070_n     The Crazy Wheelers team; comprising Gary Stephenson, son Harry (16), brother-in-law Allan Davidson and nephew Lex (13) cycled from London to Brighton to encourage sponsorship and raise awareness for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund.

     Gary lost his father-in-law, Pat Sullivan to pancreatic cancer last year within weeks of a surprise diagnosis and with survival rates for the disease especially low, at just 3%, the need to fund ongoing research is vital.

936459_665159586831307_600355296_n     The Wheelers journey is even more incredible as their youngest member, Lex Stephenson is already familiar with the devastating effects of cancer having battled leukaemia since the age of 4.  Lex, who is now in remission, continues to receive considerable support from local and national childhood cancer charities and wanted to extend his fundraising to help other organisations.

1002699_665159780164621_1289522462_n     At the time of writing the team have raised over £1,700 of their £2,000 target and are still accepting donations now their challenge is complete.  It is easy and safe to donate online via the following link…      

 http://www.justgiving.com/teams/crazywheelers – you can also support individual team members and find information on how to donate by text.

Read more about The Crazy Wheelers…

https://lilywight.com/2013/06/22/london-to-brighton-pedalling-to-beat-pancreatic-cancer/

http://www.thisishullandeastriding.co.uk/Lex-13-cycling-marathon-beating-leukaemia/story-19428770-detail/story.html#axzz2Xb4rBeV2

DONATE HERE 🙂

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http://www.justgiving.com/teams/crazywheelers

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2013-05-23-073     A brave and determined Yorkshire schoolboy is set to cycle an astonishing 75 miles to raise funds for the Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund (registered charity no. 1103253).

     Lex Stephenson, age 13, will be taking part in the Capital To Coast Cycle Challenge on Sunday 30th June 2013, starting at The London Eye and finishing at Brighton Pier.  Lex will be riding as part of a four man team, The Crazy Wheeler’s, with his Dad, his Uncle and his sixteen year old cousin.  The Wheelers were inspired to take part in the fundraising challenge after losing a family member to Pancreatic Cancer suddenly last year.

     Lex hopes his 75 mile journey will raise awareness of the vital need to fund research into cures for all types of cancer.  In 2004, when he was just four years old, Lex was diagnosed with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia and underwent a gruelling three years of continual chemotherapy treatment.  Despite great discomfort and long stays in hospital Lex continued to ride his bike regularly and believes that fresh air and exercise helped him to stay fit and keep positive throughout his illness and recuperation.  Lex remains in remission and celebrated the end of his treatment with a Star Wars Fundraising Party for Children With Cancer UK (registered charity no. 298405).

     During the last forty years survival rates for Childhood Leukaemia have risen from few to 80% whilst survival rates for Pancreatic Cancer remain low at just 3%.  Lex is now focusing his continuing fundraising efforts towards helping to beat a deadly disease in need of greater awareness.

     You can read about Lex’s bike ride challenge and support him with an immediate donation via the link below.  If everyone who reads his story shares it and donates £1 Lex will be well on his way to reaching his fundraising target.

Donate here ~ http://www.justgiving.com/Lex-Stephenson

Thank you 🙂

Related Links

Children With Cancer UK ~ Lex’s Story

Pancreatic Cancer Research Fund Website

Capital To Coast London To Brighton Charity Bike Ride Website

PLEASE SUPPORT LEX ON HIS CYCLE RIDE  ~ http://www.justgiving.com/Lex-Stephenson

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     The following “lunatic” spread features Patrick Valenza’s cheeky Deviant Moon Tarot; an inspiring deck with a wicked sense of humour!

     Please feel free to post your thoughts in the comments box below…

1.  The Enquirer/Present Day ~ The Queen Of Cups

The imaginative and empathetic Queen has much in common with The Enquirer; suggesting she is currently content, following her heart, being true to herself and achieving the right balance to stop that full cup from spilling over!  The Queen has much love to give and is inclined to take control of relationships but she is easily hurt and must choose her companions carefully.  With any tendencies to be secretive or possessive kept in check The Queen is at her most perceptive.  It is a time to nurture emotional fulfillment and finish what others have started.

2.  Past Influences ~ The Emperor

In the previous reading The Emperor appeared as a negative wish but he has lapsed into the past and been transformed into something positive suggesting valuable lessons have been well learned.  The Enquirer has become more inclined to shoulder responsibilities instead of wishing them away and has found a better balance between remaining independent and accepting advice.  The Emperor has triumphed over any ill-will directed at The Enquirer (see positions 3. and 5.) so self-confidence is renewed and ambitions return.  Solid foundations exist for a successful future.

3.  Subconscious Influences ~ The 6 Of Cups (inverted)

Painful emotional ties to the past have created an emotional drain.  Negative nostalgia saps energy and threatens depression by compromising The Enquirer’s ability to make positive choices for the future.  The Enquirer is encouraged to let go of the past and open their heart to new possibilities.

4.  Secret Wishes & Desires ~ The Four Of Pentacles

The Enquirer harbours a desire to thoroughly organise the financial and practical side of their life.  Financial security is hoped for; a wish to live well and make provision for the future.  The Enquirer knows how to value money but not idolise it, they are cautious in good measure and wise to resist the miser at their shoulder.

5.  Hidden Forces ~ The Three Of Wands (inverted)

Indecisiveness, heeding bad advice and an inability to resist negativity have secretly thwarted The Enquirer for some time.  The Three Of Wands, combined with The Six Of Cups (position. 3) has chipped away at creativity and productivity so The Enquirer feels as though they are “being tested”.  This card comes with some very good advice; “When your heart speaks, listen.  If something doesn’t serve you, drop it.”  The Emperor’s lessons (position 2.) are more than a match for these hidden forces!

6.  Events To Come ~ The Lovers

A crossroad is coming and a choice must be made: to stay the same or make a change.  Life-changing choices come with great risks but the payoff is happiness and emotional fulfillment for those who follow their hearts.  This card signifies union and the joining of opposites.  The Enquirer will soon devote themselves to whoever is sacred in their life.

7.  Surrounding Environment ~ The Four Of Swords

The recurrence and positioning of Fours in the spread suggest a stable and peaceful environment in which to grow, a place where past difficulties can be laid to rest and new vigour will arise.  The Four Of Swords represents a period of indulgent respite.  Suffering and tension will be laid aside.  The Enquirer can revel in this interlude following The Lovers union.

8.  The Influence Of Others ~ The Six Of Wands (inverted)

The Six Of Wands indicates a joyous celebration, it can never be a “bad” card, the inversion simply suggests a delay in the outcome.  Others may not respond, participate or adapt as expected to The Enquirer’s happiness but this can not diminish it or the knowledge that difficulties have been transcended.

9.  Spiritual Forces ~ The Seven Of Cups (inverted)

The Artist combines creativity with hard work, trusting his instincts and learning where to focus his vision without distraction.  In this happy time he brings a small warning to keep a firm grip on reality because what The Enquirer wants and needs is right in front of them.  Prioritise what is real and be mindful of how the inverted Six Of Cups and Three Of Wands have caused distraction and stirred defeatism in the past!

10.  The Final Outcome ~ The Six Of Swords

This card literally depicts a journey over or near water.  It is a significant break to mark the end of a trying time and a reminder that the world can be a beautiful place.  Action does not have to be aggressive and retreat does not have to mean defeat – an entirely positive “escape” is forecast: a journey into a more productive phase.  The Enquirer is on the right course.

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