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Posts Tagged ‘Spirituality’

Lily Wight

     Updated 23/09/2014

     The Wheel Of The Year calendar comprises four Celtic fire festivals interspersed with two solstice and two equinox celebrations.  September’s Equinox denotes the height of the Autumn season.

     The Autumn Equinox is named variably as Modron (Mother Goddess) or Mabon (Divine Son) – deities from Welsh Mythology who can be found in The Legends Of King Arthur.

     Modron is a harvest and fertility goddess who shares characteristics with the Roman Ceres.  On the agricultural calendar Lughnasadh (August) is The First Harvest (grains and cereals) and The Autumn Equinox (September) is The Second Harvest (fruits and vegetables).

     At the Equinox the year wanes, yet the harvest is plentiful.   The ancient tribal people of The Western Hemisphere believed their Mother Goddess entered the third trimester of her pregnancy whilst her…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 24/06/2014

     The ancient seasonal calendar – known as The Wheel Of The Year – has reached Litha (meaning “wheel”) also known as The Longest Day, Midsummer and The Summer Solstice.

     Litha marks the height of the sun’s powers at the middle of the year before the inevitable shortening of daylight hours.

     Midsummer has been observed since Neolithic times.  It held special significance to the Scandinavian, Germanic and Anglo-Saxon people and is still celebrated throughout The Northern Hemisphere today.

     Litha was a time to urge the growth of crops in the hope of a plentiful harvest.  A wheel would be set on fire and rolled downhill to “warm” the fields, a practice first recorded two thousand years ago.

     Golden-flowered  Midsummer plants, such as Calendula and St. John’s…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 29/04/2014

     Beltane (meaning “bright fire”) or May Day is one of eight festival days marked upon the ancient seasonal calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.

     Beltane heralds the beginning of Summer as it lies halfway between The Spring Equinox (Ostara) and The Summer Solstice (Litha).  It is a time when daylight hours are long, trees blossom and herding animals are turned out to pasture.

     Beltane was originally observed by the Gaelic people of Ireland, Scotland and The Isle Of Man who performed protective rituals for their crops and livestock whilst The Celtic Tribes of Western Europe and Britain also celebrated mating rituals and male potency.

     Beltane is named for the Celtic Sun God, Bel (Belenos/Belenus) who is associated with West Cornwall, formerly Belerion.  The Romans dubbed him the “British Apollo” and…

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Lily Wight

     Updated 15/03/2014

     Ostara (Old High German) or Ēostre (Old English) falls upon 20th March.  It is one of eight ancient Wheel Of The Year festivals denoting seasonal shifts.

     Ostara marks The Vernal (meaning “youthful”) Equinox: the height of Spring.

     Daylight and darkness are balanced at The Equinox, prior to the lengthening of days: a period sometimes referred to as Lent.  It is a time to celebrate fecundity and growth.

     Ostara is named for an ancient Germanic goddess and the month that bears her name; Ôstarmânoth, now April.

     Ostara is a dawn goddess associated to the Greek Eos and the Roman Aurora.  She represents the resurrection of light following the death of Winter.

     Ostara’s totem animal is the hare: a symbol of fertility dating…

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Lily Wight

     Updated for 2015

     Imbolc (pronounced i-MOLK meaning “in the belly”) is one of eight seasonal festivals marked on the ancient calendar known as The Wheel Of The Year.  Imbolc is observed on 1st February each year.

     Imbolc heralds the first stirrings of  Spring as it lies halfway between The Winter Solstice (Yule) and The Spring Equinox (Ostara).  It is a time when days lengthen, new buds and shoots appear and the first lambs are born.

     Imbolc was originally observed by the Gaelic (Irish, Scottish and Manx) people as a vital indicator of a new agricultural year.

     The festival was deemed sacred to the Gaelic goddess Brighid (pronounced breed) the midwife of the year and protector of women, children and newborns. 

     Hearthfire celebrations involved the baking of bannocks; the origin…

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     Patrick Valenza’s Deviant Moon Tarot in the Lunatic Spread read by Lily Wight for The Arcade of Arts & Arcana (Winter).

     Begin centre-left and proceed anti-clockwise;

WP_0000111.  The Four of Cups (inverted)

2.  The Ace of Wands

3.  The Ten of Swords (inverted)

4.  The Six of Pentacles (inverted)

5.  THE HANGED MAN (inverted)

6.  The Four of Swords (inverted)

7.  The Queen of Swords (inverted)

8.  The Eight of Cups

9.  The Five of Swords (inverted)

10.  The Ten of Wands (inverted)

Quick Notes

     There is only one Major Arcana card suggesting The Enquirer is guiding current circumstances.  The Hanged Man appeared previously right-side up as a subconscious influence, now he is inverted in the external environment.  His role is evolving, balance is reasserting and The Hanged Man’s control is waning.

     The number of inverted cards is unusually high so a situation is currently at tipping point or in the process of being turned on its head.

     The Suit of Swords dominates throughout the spread suggesting the last stage of effort in action or crisis.

     The Enquirer’s favourite/personal card, The Eight of Cups appears (mirroring another Cup – or Heart – card in position 1.)  This reading involves an important emotional matter-of-the-heart for The Enquirer.

     The Ace of Wands also appeared in the previous spread.  Its motivational influence has now moved into the past.

     There is only one Court Card, or significant “other”, in this spread.  The Queen of Swords is a frequent negative visitor for this Enquirer but her influence has waned.

WP_000011Card By Card

1.  The Enquirer / The Present ~ The Four of Cups (inverted)

Realise the need to drop all that has proved disappointing.  This is not a failure but an opportunity to grasp a bright new outlook.  Consolidate new and better emotional foundations.

2.  Past Influences ~ The Ace of Wands

A recent burst of creative energy has already instigated a new productive cycle in work and social activities.

3.  Subconscious Influences (internal/unknown) ~ The Ten of Swords (inverted)

A final surge of courage is required to break traps of defeat and betrayal and gain the edge over old problems.  Stop expecting the worst, turn away from unpleasantness and achieve the freedom to rebuild self-confidence.

4.  Secret Wishes & Desires ~ The Six of Pentacles (inverted)

A practical wish to be more selfish and less generous with a desire for more control and quicker gratification.  Live in the now!

5.  Hidden Forces (external/unknown) ~ THE HANGED MAN (inverted)

The Enquirer is no longer hanging but still tethered.  Emotional blackmail forces masochism so fight restraints imposed by the past, the self and others.

6.  Events To Come ~ The Four of Swords (inverted)

Activity will begin with renewed vigour when The Enquirer accepts that problems will always exist and success is measured not by solving them but by how they are dealt with.  The world outside starts to look more appealing; wake up Sleeping Beauty and be your own hero!

WP_0000117.  Surrounding Environment ~ The Queen of Swords (inverted)

The Enquirer has tolerated this manipulative schemer to keep the peace but boundaries have at last been set to block her controlling nature and negativity.

8.  The Influence Of Others ~ The Eight of Cups

Self-awareness minimises external influences and builds the courage to make better choices.  Move on, follow the heart’s desire and seek a truer path.

9.  Spiritual Forces (upon the environment) ~ The Five of Swords (inverted)

The Enquirer will part from their troubles when a false friend is exposed and disarmed for the sake of peace and harmony.  What feels like a loss is truly a success.  Protect yourself on the road to self-reliance.

10.  The Final Outcome ~ The Ten of Swords (inverted)

There are inherent difficulties in completing the old and starting the new simultaneously.  Forget patience, release excess burdens and responsibilities and rush to your goals.  A new beginning is tantalisingly close.

WP_000011

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Updated 18/12/2014

     There are four Solar Quarter Days (two equinoxes and two solstices) on The Wheel of The Year calendar.  Yule or The Winter Solstice is celebrated during a twelve day period from December into January.

     Yule commemorates the demise and rebirth of the sun’s powers because The Wheel continues to turn and daylight hours begin to lengthen again beyond The Shortest Day.

     The name “Yule” is thought to derive from the Old Norse ” jólnar”  – a collective term for the gods or “Yule Ones”.   Jólfaðr (Yule Father – interchangeable with All-Father) is one of many names attributed to Odin.  In Old Norse poetry names and terms for Odin are frequently synonymous with celebration and feasting.  Odin The Gift-Giver is undoubtedly the origin of our Santa Claus.

     The Midwinter period between the last harvest (Samhain) and the stirrings of Spring (Imbolc) was a time of hardship for agricultural communities.  A feast of preserved foods and good fellowship whilst celebrating warmth and light would boost morale and inspire hope during a bleak and inhospitable time.

     Homes and halls would be decorated with evergreens to symbolise life’s tenacity in a barren landscape and anticipate the rebirth of Spring.  Spikey holly – with its blood-red berries – represented protection, ivy denoted endurance and mistletoe (for kissing under) symbolised fertility.

     Germanic and Celtic people perceived the mating cycle of their Father and Mother deities in the changing seasons.  At Midwinter the solar god – who passed into The Underworld at Samhain (Halloween) is reincarnated as his own sacred son and “reborn” to the goddess at Yule.

     Yule is also regarded as the season of The Wild Hunt, a supernatural procession of hounds, horses and huntsmen.  Hunt leaders vary, from horned gods to folk heroes, depending on country and culture.  In the United Kingdom hunt leaders include Odin’s equivalent Woden, Gaelic Fairy Folk, Herne The Hunter and King Arthur.

     Hunt leaders, often cursed into service, would manifest in their most violent and dangerous forms to cleanse the realm, both spiritually and physically, by rounding-up stray spirits, changelings, evil folk and wrongdoers.  Early Christian clerics regarded hunt legends as diabolical due to their association with horned gods and hoofed animals.  Controversial Boxing Day Hunts are still enacted throughout the UK today.

     Father Christmas’s supernatural chariot drawn by horned and hoofed reindeer bears association to The Wild Hunt.  Santa is most likely derived from Odin – a giver of gifts to those who are nice – but also, as a Hunt leader, a judge to those who are deemed “naughty”.  In Belgium and The Netherlands Santa Claus is assisted not by Norse Elves but Zwarte Piets; the devilish child-taunting mischief-makers who paint their faces to resemble, you guessed it, the followers of The Hunt.

     However you choose to celebrate remember that Yule is a time to recuperate and re-energise ourselves in preparation for another turn of The Wheel and the coming of a brand new Spring.

 

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